20,000 miles in a CX5 GT-R...

Great, great write up. I wonder if this is the issue with the tranny you were describing ? We have Eternal Blue, also. Who provides the warranty? Mazda????

"Active Adaptive Shift (AAS) automatically controls the transaxle shift points to best suit the road conditions and driver input. This improves driving feel. The transaxle may switch to AAS mode when driving up and down slopes, cornering, driving at high elevations, or depressing the accelerator pedal quickly while the selector lever is in the D position. Depending on the road and driving conditions/vehicle operations, gear shifting could be delayed or not occur, however, this does not indicate a problem because the AAS mode will maintain the optimum gear position."
 
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:
CX5 GT-R
Great, great write up. I wonder if this is the issue with the tranny you were describing ? We have Eternal Blue, also. Who provides the warranty? Mazda????

"Active Adaptive Shift (AAS) automatically controls the transaxle shift points to best suit the road conditions and driver input. This improves driving feel. The transaxle may switch to AAS mode when driving up and down slopes, cornering, driving at high elevations, or depressing the accelerator pedal quickly while the selector lever is in the D position. Depending on the road and driving conditions/vehicle operations, gear shifting could be delayed or not occur, however, this does not indicate a problem because the AAS mode will maintain the optimum gear position."

Yes! Very likely
 
:
Fmr CX5 Touring
Damn, that's a review.

I posted here a bit a few years ago when I had a 2015. It didn't rattle but it was noisy (wind and road). I got rid of it for an Accord, had all the toys I wanted, but sometimes you need something with just a little bit of ground clearance, and the new Accords don't have it. Mine also has low-profile tires and potholes are scary and hit hard.

You addressed some questions: noise improvement, figured the knob would be terrible and maybe it isn't, but still have a couple.

On my CX-5 there were times, especially in an emergency, where my size 12 hit both brake and gas at the same time. I stopped safely, but it never felt certain that I'd hit the brake cleanly. Still a problem? Never a problem for you?

I use Adaptive cruise extensively and I trust my car, most of the time, because I do hit the brake and sometimes it's too aggressive about stopping, to stop from speed. It sounds like the CX-5 is maybe less confidence inspiring?

Is the center armrest still too far back and too small?

Finally, I remember the handling being fun but not great. By that I mean I'd enjoy cornering but it also felt like it was going to roll if I pushed, something, my current, uh, car, doesn't do. I did drive a 2017 GT and remember it feeling planted, but, somehow, less dynamic, if that even makes sense.

Thanks for any insight.
 
:
CX5 GT-R
Damn, that's a review.

I posted here a bit a few years ago when I had a 2015. It didn't rattle but it was noisy (wind and road). I got rid of it for an Accord, had all the toys I wanted, but sometimes you need something with just a little bit of ground clearance, and the new Accords don't have it. Mine also has low-profile tires and potholes are scary and hit hard.

You addressed some questions: noise improvement, figured the knob would be terrible and maybe it isn't, but still have a couple.

On my CX-5 there were times, especially in an emergency, where my size 12 hit both brake and gas at the same time. I stopped safely, but it never felt certain that I'd hit the brake cleanly. Still a problem? Never a problem for you?

I use Adaptive cruise extensively and I trust my car, most of the time, because I do hit the brake and sometimes it's too aggressive about stopping, to stop from speed. It sounds like the CX-5 is maybe less confidence inspiring?

Is the center armrest still too far back and too small?

Finally, I remember the handling being fun but not great. By that I mean I'd enjoy cornering but it also felt like it was going to roll if I pushed, something, my current, uh, car, doesn't do. I did drive a 2017 GT and remember it feeling planted, but, somehow, less dynamic, if that even makes sense.

Thanks for any insight.

I've never felt concern over my cx5 rolling. It feels planted, to me, even ignoring its ground clearance.

The other issues are things I never noticed as an issue in my 2015, and are personal kinematics. You will need to test.

The cx5 doing 70mph coming up on stopped traffic...worries me. I've not tested it fully, but it worries me if you rely 100% on the computer, there.
 
:
2019 CX-5 Signature
...
The cx5 doing 70mph coming up on stopped traffic...worries me. I've not tested it fully, but it worries me if you rely 100% on the computer, there.

Adaptive Cruise Control is a great feature, that allows you to rest your leg longer than the old standard Cruise Control. As it monitors the speed of the vehicle directly in the path in front of you and adapts to keep you a safe distance behind it. You should not be using it like some form of "Auto Pilot". If you see vehicles stopped in front of you, use your brakes the old fashioned way.
 

Chris_Top_Her

Banned
Moderator
Contributor
:
San Antonio, Texas
:
'15 CX-5 Miata AWD
Damn, that's a review.

I posted here a bit a few years ago when I had a 2015. It didn't rattle but it was noisy (wind and road). I got rid of it for an Accord, had all the toys I wanted, but sometimes you need something with just a little bit of ground clearance, and the new Accords don't have it. Mine also has low-profile tires and potholes are scary and hit hard.

You addressed some questions: noise improvement, figured the knob would be terrible and maybe it isn't, but still have a couple.

On my CX-5 there were times, especially in an emergency, where my size 12 hit both brake and gas at the same time. I stopped safely, but it never felt certain that I'd hit the brake cleanly. Still a problem? Never a problem for you?

I use Adaptive cruise extensively and I trust my car, most of the time, because I do hit the brake and sometimes it's too aggressive about stopping, to stop from speed. It sounds like the CX-5 is maybe less confidence inspiring?

Is the center armrest still too far back and too small?

Finally, I remember the handling being fun but not great. By that I mean I'd enjoy cornering but it also felt like it was going to roll if I pushed, something, my current, uh, car, doesn't do. I did drive a 2017 GT and remember it feeling planted, but, somehow, less dynamic, if that even makes sense.

Thanks for any insight.

The whack OEM tires paired with skinny wheels are a big factor in the body roll, and then of course the ride height. I send it around corners (I paid for AWD I make good use of it) into triple digit sometimes.. flipping is not my concern ever; its actually oversteer haha.. and that's mainly because DSC does some dumb counterintuitive stuff to prevent/reduce it
 

Avoidin Deer

Zoom Zoom, baby
Contributor
:
Central Virginia
:
2019 CX-5 Reserve
Adaptive Cruise Control is a great feature, that allows you to rest your leg longer than the old standard Cruise Control. As it monitors the speed of the vehicle directly in the path in front of you and adapts to keep you a safe distance behind it. You should not be using it like some form of "Auto Pilot". If you see vehicles stopped in front of you, use your brakes the old fashioned way.

Yeh, it's not like we're Tesla owners ;)

I was driving this evening down my 55 MPH legacy interstate on cruise control set north of 60. A car pulled out from a side street in front of me and proceeded to do 40. Once the accelerator-challenged country boy was within radar range (bless his heart), the CX-5 braked hard because the distance was closing so quickly. The range of the radar obviously ain't the same as our vision, so cannot anticipate quite as well and elegantly slow down.

I have no concerns that my car would not auto-stop from highway speeds, but as you say, these are not self-drivers. My main concern would be the guy behind me might not react to such abrupt braking if I left it to my car to control.
 
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ColoradoDriver

Gen-1 Kodo Design
Contributor
:
Denver, CO
:
2014 CX-5 Touring
I guess I am alone in that I can count on one hand how often I've used cruise control in 6 1/2 years.
 

Avoidin Deer

Zoom Zoom, baby
Contributor
:
Central Virginia
:
2019 CX-5 Reserve
I guess I am alone in that I can count on one hand how often I've used cruise control in 6 1/2 years.

That's interesting.

i use it in traffic to maintain a consistent following distance (so I don't fall behind or sneak up on), and I use it outside of traffic to maximize MPG.

I've even used it when I lived in the suburbs and would get off the interstate and immediately be on 25 MPG roads. I'd sometimes find myself speeding (especially on nice Spring days with Van Halen tunes playing), and would use cruise control to hold my speed down.
 

shadonoz

SkyActiv Member
Contributor
:
State of Jefferson
:
2017 CX-5 GT AWD+
The range of the radar obviously ain't the same as our vision, so cannot anticipate quite as well and elegantly slow down.

Sounds like you need to reduce your following distance setting. Then maybe you'll have time to react in situations like that.

Alternately, if you feather the brake when you see something like that up ahead, it won't brake like that at all, you'll have control.

My main concern would be the guy behind me might not react to such abrupt braking if I left it to my car to control.

A valid concern, but as the insurance policy says, it is better to BE hit than to hit.
 

shadonoz

SkyActiv Member
Contributor
:
State of Jefferson
:
2017 CX-5 GT AWD+
That's interesting.

i use it in traffic to maintain a consistent following distance (so I don't fall behind or sneak up on), and I use it outside of traffic to maximize MPG.

I've even used it when I lived in the suburbs and would get off the interstate and immediately be on 25 MPG roads. I'd sometimes find myself speeding (especially on nice Spring days with Van Halen tunes playing), and would use cruise control to hold my speed down.

Me, too. I'll use it anytime I'm just piloting the car as opposed to driving, unless it's congested.

I'll do about 85 MPH on a 25 MPG road. ;)
 
:
2018 AWD GT Premium Red/Black
I guess I am alone in that I can count on one hand how often I've used cruise control in 6 1/2 years.

I've had cruise control for 25 years or so on my cars and almost never used it because its annoying and doesn't feel safe to have my foot in a position that isn't referenced to the brake pedal. I use adaptive cruise control on the Mazda often, pretty much any time I'm on the freeway for 10 minutes or more. It improves mileage and reduces mental fatigue.
 

Chocolate

Harpy Eagle
:
2019 CX-5 AWD
I guess I am alone in that I can count on one hand how often I've used cruise control in 6 1/2 years.

I never liked it, I never use it, traditional or radar based. Haven't felt the need for the radar cruise, I just use the good old fashioned accelerator pedal.

The radar is very useful for the AEB.
 
:
Ottawa, Ontario
:
17 Mazda 6 GT
I never liked it, I never use it, traditional or radar based. Haven't felt the need for the radar cruise, I just use the good old fashioned accelerator pedal.

The radar is very useful for the AEB.

How you cannot like cruise control is hard to understand, especially on long highway drives.
I don't care how good you are with your right foot, there's no way you can focus continually on your speedo, and keep a steady speed, for any length of time.
It's physically and mentally draining.
There's also nothing more annoying than travelling on an interstate behind someone that doesn't have or use cruise.
They are not hard to pick out. They go from 55, to 80, and everything in between, with no consistency.
They also always slow down on an incline, and speed up going downhill. Super annoying.
The first time I drove a car with cruise control, I swore I'd never have another car without it.
Now that I have a car with adaptive cruise, I'll never have another vehicle without that feature either.
Start using your cruise control. It will make you, and everyone else, happier.
 
:
CX5 GT-R
How you cannot like cruise control is hard to understand, especially on long highway drives.
I don't care how good you are with your right foot, there's no way you can focus continually on your speedo, and keep a steady speed, for any length of time.
It's physically and mentally draining.
There's also nothing more annoying than travelling on an interstate behind someone that doesn't have or use cruise.
They are not hard to pick out. They go from 55, to 80, and everything in between, with no consistency.
They also always slow down on an incline, and speed up going downhill. Super annoying.
The first time I drove a car with cruise control, I swore I'd never have another car without it.
Now that I have a car with adaptive cruise, I'll never have another vehicle without that feature either.
Start using your cruise control. It will make you, and everyone else, happier.

I have driven plenty of long trips without CC. It's not the best, but its certainly not required. Speed management was never an issue. At all. In any way. Impulse control in some vehicles I've owned might have been, though, lol!
 
:
2019 CX5 Reserve AWD
Always used cruise control but hated it unless it was a long stretch of open road. Used to hate that when you slow down and re-engage cruise it used to take off at a high rate of speed to get back to the set speed. Used radar cruise the other day and was mildly surprised. It drove almost like I would, it didn't floor the car to get back to the set speed but slowly accelerated like I would keeping a proper distance between the car in front of me.
 

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