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Thread: Must have CX-5 Tools and Items

  1. #31
    Registered Member ralf11's Avatar


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    I don't suppose anyone happens ot know if the oil filter 'wrench' that works on a Porsche Boxster is the same size as for a CX5 turbo? (GT-R)


    also, old air-cooled 911s have a variety of nylon lined and aluminum sockets for the lug nuts - no idea if those will fit the CX5 lug nuts

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chocolate View Post
    Thanks for your input. I'm not in a rush when I'm doing it so my preference is to lift a corner a time and then put the stands nearby on the frame. Lifting on the two central points is faster.
    I'm not in a rush either, but it simply makes sense and is easier to use the central jacking points instead of the pinch welds.
    As a bonus, you don't have to worry about purchasing/using the special pads you had to buy.

    Also, this is a unibody vehicle without a traditional frame.
    So where do you put the jack stands "nearby on the frame"? Are these Mazda-approved locations?

  3. #33
    Registered Member Chocolate's Avatar

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    @bluegrass I'm well aware it's a unibody, my last vehicle was a body-on-frame truck; I guess I should have said frame rails, if that's OK?
    Last edited by Chocolate; 08-28-2019 at 05:37 AM.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chocolate View Post
    @bluegrass I'm well aware it's a unibody, my last vehicle was a body-on-frame truck; I guess I should have said frame rails, if that's OK?
    Actually, the CX-5 does not have "frame rails" like a traditional body-on-frame.
    That is why they require the use of the pinch welds for jacks and jack stands.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chocolate View Post
    Thanks for your input. I'm not in a rush when I'm doing it so my preference is to lift a corner a time and then put the stands nearby on the frame. Lifting on the two central points is faster.
    I've done that on my old car when changing brakes. Lift at the pinch weld and put a jack stand, and tire, under to catch the car if my jack failed. One isn't under the car to change brakes so the car won't fall on you. Getting all wheels off the ground is for rotating the tires faster instead of jacking each tire up, putting the spare on, move the tire to next etc.

  6. #36
    Registered Member Chocolate's Avatar

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    Okay so I've gotten a closer look at the pinch welds, and they are much more robust than the ones on my ES 330. Those actually have substantial cutouts to mark the pinch weld, terrible design. I guess that design and the damage that resulted probably led to my unease with that design. The Mazda points are reinforced on the inside and outside with no cutouts, three layers thick, so I'm not worried about it.
    Last edited by Chocolate; 08-28-2019 at 08:19 PM.

  7. #37
    Registered Member Chocolate's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by bluegrass View Post
    Actually, the CX-5 does not have "frame rails" like a traditional body-on-frame.
    That is why they require the use of the pinch welds for jacks and jack stands.
    According to Mazda's product evaluation engineer it does.

    https://www.wardsauto.com/technology...ong-cx-5-frame

    LOS ANGELES – Mazda’s new CX-5 has a higher concentration of lightweight steel than any model in the brand’s North American showroom.

    High-tensile-strength steel accounts for 61% of the small cross/utility vehicle’s body weight, Dave Coleman, Mazda’s product evaluation engineer, tells media here at a recent launch event.

    The CX-5 also boasts what Mazda believes is the first series-production application of steel rated at 1,800 MPa (18,979 tons per sq. in.)
    That grade is “the strongest steel anybody has used in a production car (and) we’re using that on the outer surface of the bumpers of this car,” Coleman says.
    As a result, weight is trimmed from the extreme ends of the CX-5, thereby reducing polar movement and improving vehicle handling, he says.
    In addition, sections of the CUV’s frame rails were straightened, while other parts were designed with complex shapes. The result was improved crashworthiness.

    Historically, Mazda has used rectangular-shaped front frame rails, but the CX-5 features stronger, cross-shaped patterns.
    "If you’ve got a rectangular frame rail, all the load is being carried in the corners of that rail,” Coleman says. “If we can fit it into this cross-shape, we end up with 12 corners instead of four corners. It doesn’t weigh any more, but we’ve got more places to carry that load.”

    And by straightening the frame rails at the bottom of the CX-5, Mazda has saved weight and added strength.
    Mazda frame rails long have done a “zig-zag” around a vehicle’s fuel tank. “That zig-zag is an inherently weak structure,” Coleman says. Therefore, it required more steel, which added weight.
    “By just gently curving around the gas tank (with) one continuous frame rail, we can use less material to carry the same load,” Coleman says.
    To better disperse crash loads, Mazda engineers extended the CX-5’s front sub-frame. Also, door beams run parallel to carry a load to the rear of the car.

    The roof, B-pillar and C-pillar each boast a ring-link design for additional structural integrity.
    “(We’re) just trying to connect all the structures as much as possible so it can be hit from any angle, and also these are getting us simultaneously a good structure to mount a suspension on,” Coleman says, noting suspension loads are exceeded only by crash loads as a stressor.

    The CX-5 is considered all-new by Mazda, and not a successor to the defunct body-on-frame Tribute SUV, so Coleman compares the CX-5’s weight savings to the slightly bigger CX-7 CUV.
    In their trimmest iterations, the CX-5 is 288 lbs. (131 kg) lighter than the CX-7. The weight difference between the heaviest CX-5 and its CX-7 counterpart is 570 lbs. (259 kg).
    The new ’13 Mazda CX-5 goes on sale in the U.S. early this year, with pricing expected to range from $22,000-$28,000.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chocolate View Post
    According to Mazda's product evaluation engineer it does.

    https://www.wardsauto.com/technology...ong-cx-5-frame
    Interesting stuff.

    Thanks.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chocolate View Post
    According to Mazda's product evaluation engineer it does.
    Our discussion is about the CX-5 "frame rails" (your words) you claim to put jack stands under to support the vehicle.

    As I said previously, the CX-5 does not have traditional "frame rails" that you can just slap jack stands under.
    This is why Mazda specifies using the pinch welds at the corner of the vehicle, to be used in the absence of traditional "frame rails."

    If you are using the pinch welds to jack up the vehicle with the floor jack, where exactly are these "frame rails" you're placing the jack stands?

  10. #40
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    Arrow Must have CX-5 Tools and Items

    Quote Originally Posted by bluegrass View Post
    Our discussion is about the CX-5 "frame rails" (your words) you claim to put jack stands under to support the vehicle.

    As I said previously, the CX-5 does not have traditional "frame rails" that you can just slap jack stands under.
    This is why Mazda specifies using the pinch welds at the corner of the vehicle, to be used in the absence of traditional "frame rails."

    If you are using the pinch welds to jack up the vehicle with the floor jack, where exactly are these "frame rails" you're placing the jack stands?
    Exactly!

  11. #41
    Registered Member CX-5um's Avatar

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVTp8EpzZ5E

    Added 5 psi per tire in a matter of seconds yesterday. Set your psi and it automatically shuts off when reached. Stays planted and does not hop around. No cords to deal with. I also used it to inflate a yoga fitness ball.

    Not a must have but is sure nice to have

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Slime-Tre...SABEgItFfD_BwE

    Now this tool is a must have imho. Measures the thread of your tires.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by CX-5um View Post
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVTp8EpzZ5E

    Added 5 psi per tire in a matter of seconds yesterday. Set your psi and it automatically shuts off when reached. Stays planted and does not hop around. No cords to deal with. I also used it to inflate a yoga fitness ball.

    Not a must have but is sure nice to have

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Slime-Tre...SABEgItFfD_BwE

    Now this tool is a must have imho. Measures the thread of your tires.
    I like that depth gauge. And less than $3!

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralf11 View Post
    I don't suppose anyone happens ot know if the oil filter 'wrench' that works on a Porsche Boxster is the same size as for a CX5 turbo? (GT-R)


    also, old air-cooled 911s have a variety of nylon lined and aluminum sockets for the lug nuts - no idea if those will fit the CX5 lug nuts
    The 987 & 981 Boxster oil filter wrench is ~ 74 - 76 mm. For the CX5 turbo filter, I use CTA 65MM- 67MM CAP OIL FILTER WRENCH A255.

    Don't know about the old 911 lugs, but the CX5 lug nuts are 21mm.

  14. #44
    Registered Member ralf11's Avatar


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    Thx - will to have ot buy some new stuff...

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chocolate View Post
    According to Mazda's product evaluation engineer it does.

    https://www.wardsauto.com/technology...ong-cx-5-frame

    LOS ANGELES * Mazda*s new CX-5 has a higher concentration of lightweight steel than any model in the brand*s North American showroom.

    High-tensile-strength steel accounts for 61% of the small cross/utility vehicle*s body weight, Dave Coleman, Mazda*s product evaluation engineer, tells media here at a recent launch event.

    The CX-5 also boasts what Mazda believes is the first series-production application of steel rated at 1,800 MPa (18,979 tons per sq. in.)
    That grade is *the strongest steel anybody has used in a production car (and) we*re using that on the outer surface of the bumpers of this car,* Coleman says.
    As a result, weight is trimmed from the extreme ends of the CX-5, thereby reducing polar movement and improving vehicle handling, he says.
    In addition, sections of the CUV*s frame rails were straightened, while other parts were designed with complex shapes. The result was improved crashworthiness.

    Historically, Mazda has used rectangular-shaped front frame rails, but the CX-5 features stronger, cross-shaped patterns.
    "If you*ve got a rectangular frame rail, all the load is being carried in the corners of that rail,* Coleman says. *If we can fit it into this cross-shape, we end up with 12 corners instead of four corners. It doesn*t weigh any more, but we*ve got more places to carry that load.*

    And by straightening the frame rails at the bottom of the CX-5, Mazda has saved weight and added strength.
    Mazda frame rails long have done a *zig-zag* around a vehicle*s fuel tank. *That zig-zag is an inherently weak structure,* Coleman says. Therefore, it required more steel, which added weight.
    *By just gently curving around the gas tank (with) one continuous frame rail, we can use less material to carry the same load,* Coleman says.
    To better disperse crash loads, Mazda engineers extended the CX-5*s front sub-frame. Also, door beams run parallel to carry a load to the rear of the car.

    The roof, B-pillar and C-pillar each boast a ring-link design for additional structural integrity.
    *(We*re) just trying to connect all the structures as much as possible so it can be hit from any angle, and also these are getting us simultaneously a good structure to mount a suspension on,* Coleman says, noting suspension loads are exceeded only by crash loads as a stressor.

    The CX-5 is considered all-new by Mazda, and not a successor to the defunct body-on-frame Tribute SUV, so Coleman compares the CX-5*s weight savings to the slightly bigger CX-7 CUV.
    In their trimmest iterations, the CX-5 is 288 lbs. (131 kg) lighter than the CX-7. The weight difference between the heaviest CX-5 and its CX-7 counterpart is 570 lbs. (259 kg).
    The new *13 Mazda CX-5 goes on sale in the U.S. early this year, with pricing expected to range from $22,000-$28,000.
    Nice!

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