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Thread: Swap 17 inch Touring wheels for 19 or 20 inch?

  1. #1
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    Swap 17 inch Touring wheels for 19 or 20 inch?

    Swap 17 inch Touring wheels for 19 or 20 inch? What are the advantages and disadvantages. I have the 2015 Touring and since im about to change tired I'm thinking of making the car higher or better looking. ANy wheels you guys recommend?

  2. #2
    Work in Progress sm1ke's Avatar
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    First, you'd want to keep the overall wheel diameter (tire + rim) about the same size as the OEM wheel and tire diameter. If you get larger rims and mount tires with larger sidewalls, the car will sit higher, but it will display the wrong speed on the speedometer. For example, OEM tires on a 2015 CX-5 Touring are 225/65/17. If you go to a bigger rim and keep the tire's sidewall profile (the middle number) the same, say 225/65/20, the overall diameter will increase by 3". That extra 3" will cause your speedo to read 60 mph while you're actually only going 54. The tire is also more likely to flex if you take a corner too fast.

    Now, if you want to keep the wheel diameter the same, but still get bigger rims, you'd have to go for a smaller sidewall. In the above example, instead of using 225/65/20 tires, you'd use 225/50/20 tires. The disadvantage of using a lower profile tire is that it doesn't isolate you from road imperfections as well as a higher profile tire would. Any road imperfections you drive over would sound a little more "harsh", and it will feel a little more harsh as well. Keep in mind that bigger rims are usually heavier than smaller rims, but this largely depends on the actual wheel (how it was formed ie. cast or forged, as well as wheel design). A heavier wheel translates to slightly slower acceleration and a minor decrease in mileage.

    The advantage to a lower profile tire is that the sidewall is less likely to flex while cornering aggressively, and as a result, won't feel as "mushy". Depending on your personal preferences, lower profile tires can also improve overall looks. Personally, on my CX-9, I went from a 20" OEM setup with 50-series tires to a 22" setup with 35-series tires. The 22" setup is actually lighter than the OEM 20" setup due to the rims I chose, but overall NVH has increased a tiny bit (thank God for good sound insulation, lol). I can also take sharper turns at higher speeds.

  3. #3
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    Assuming you get wheel and tire sizes that closely maintain the overall same profile for the spedometer, the 17 inch tires will better dissipate the road imperfections due to the bigger sidewall. The 17 inch tires will also be relatively to considerably cheaper than 19 or 20 inchers. That said, the 19 or 20 inch tires will feel more responsive, and if you get a thicker width tire than the OEM, should feel much better on the road.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sm1ke View Post
    first, you'd want to keep the overall wheel diameter (tire + rim) about the same size as the oem wheel and tire diameter. If you get larger rims and mount tires with larger sidewalls, the car will sit higher, but it will display the wrong speed on the speedometer. For example, oem tires on a 2015 cx-5 touring are 225/65/17. If you go to a bigger rim and keep the tire's sidewall profile (the middle number) the same, say 225/65/20, the overall diameter will increase by 3". That extra 3" will cause your speedo to read 60 mph while you're actually only going 54. The tire is also more likely to flex if you take a corner too fast.

    Now, if you want to keep the wheel diameter the same, but still get bigger rims, you'd have to go for a smaller sidewall. In the above example, instead of using 225/65/20 tires, you'd use 225/50/20 tires. The disadvantage of using a lower profile tire is that it doesn't isolate you from road imperfections as well as a higher profile tire would. Any road imperfections you drive over would sound a little more "harsh", and it will feel a little more harsh as well. Keep in mind that bigger rims are usually heavier than smaller rims, but this largely depends on the actual wheel (how it was formed ie. Cast or forged, as well as wheel design). A heavier wheel translates to slightly slower acceleration and a minor decrease in mileage.

    The advantage to a lower profile tire is that the sidewall is less likely to flex while cornering aggressively, and as a result, won't feel as "mushy". Depending on your personal preferences, lower profile tires can also improve overall looks. Personally, on my cx-9, i went from a 20" oem setup with 50-series tires to a 22" setup with 35-series tires. The 22" setup is actually lighter than the oem 20" setup due to the rims i chose, but overall nvh has increased a tiny bit (thank god for good sound insulation, lol). I can also take sharper turns at higher speeds.
    thank you

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