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Thread: How long did your brake pads last?

  1. #31
    i-ACTIV AWD Aficionado Kedis82ZE8's Avatar
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    I'm at shy of 41k miles.
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  2. #32
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    My stepdaughter has 70k miles on her front brakes with her 2014 cx5, got her rear brakes changed at 35k. My fronts on my 2014 had some pad left when I took them out at 60k, also changed my rears at 32k.

  3. #33
    Gen-1 Kodo Design 👌 ColoradoDriver's Avatar
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    Rears needed to be replaced at around 53k-54k (dont recall exactly) miles.

    I'm at 63k now and fronts are still fine.
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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by katmar View Post
    How long did your front and rear brake pads last? Just curious what the average experience is, and what to expect.

    My rear pads were just replaced at 33,000 miles (worn to the point of squealing when backing up), which seems early to me. I showed them the TSB about the rears binding and causing premature wear, but they claimed the wear pattern didn't match the TSB.

    My front pads were down to 5/10 (which was fine), but I replaced them anyway because for some reason my front rotors were badly gouged (saw them, they really were) and had to be replaced.

    Just curious if this is what I can expect to be doing every 33,000 miles?

    Any guesses as to why both front rotors were gouged even though the pads were only 1/2 worn? Road salt from the winter not being washed out often enough maybe?
    79k miles now. My rear pads are down to 3mm, but have been measuring 3mm for the last 10k+ miles. Dunno when it will die and need replacing, but not yet.

    I believe front are 5 or 6mm. Front rotors are badly warped though. A couple of repeated stops and the wheel is shaking.

  5. #35
    Structural Member shadonoz's Avatar
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    I'm surprised so many rear brakes are wearing out before the fronts. I always thought that the fronts work harder, therefore wear out faster, due to weight transfer and greater weight on the front axle. Remember when cars had discs on the front and drums on the rear? And they often [usually?] have larger discs in front than back [but only 0.2" difference on CX-5, larger in the back].

    Does anyone know why this is happening? Force distribution maybe, but why? There should normally be LESS force applied to the rears, no?

  6. #36
    Registered Member Anchorman's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by shadonoz View Post
    I'm surprised so many rear brakes are wearing out before the fronts. I always thought that the fronts work harder, therefore wear out faster, due to weight transfer and greater weight on the front axle. Remember when cars had discs on the front and drums on the rear? And they often [usually?] have larger discs in front than back [but only 0.2" difference on CX-5, larger in the back].

    Does anyone know why this is happening? Force distribution maybe, but why? There should normally be LESS force applied to the rears, no?
    Yes, quite right. On a one for one basis (considering only the size of the pads and the design forces of the calipers), the pads should wear out evenly. However, as the weight during a stop is always transferred to the front and that is constantly variable, the fronts get hotter and they wear out quicker. How fast the friction material wears is directly apportioned to heat and it is a non linear relationship, in other words, what ever the wear is at 300F isn’t doubled at 600F, it might be tripled or quadrupled. Pads need heat to make them work properly so low duty will make them sleep and high duty will excite them and make them perform best but wear quicker. Friction has nothing to do with area so you could literally cut an inch off each end of the pad and they will work exactly the same (more pressure per unit of area) but they will get hotter and in that case wear quicker.

    So back to the original question. If the rears wear quicker, it could be that the vehicle often has weight in the rear, the fronts aren’t doing what they should (maybe need servicing) and therefor push the work done to the rear or something is causing the rears to get hotter than they should like the calipers sticking slightly and they are dragging. There isn’t necessarily a fault though. It might be that the rear calipers have a lower threshold than the fronts (this is the amount of fluid pressure actually needed to bring the pads in contact with the disc) and they just apply marginally quicker but balance under heavier load. There may be slight differences on the pad compound (friction level). There is also a solid disc which may run slightly hotter than the vented one at the front - remember the fundamentals - the hotter the friction material, the quicker it wears. You can buy these point and read digital thermometers real cheap theses days that can tell the tale and they are very good for fault finding.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by shadonoz View Post
    I'm surprised so many rear brakes are wearing out before the fronts. I always thought that the fronts work harder, therefore wear out faster, due to weight transfer and greater weight on the front axle. Remember when cars had discs on the front and drums on the rear? And they often [usually?] have larger discs in front than back [but only 0.2" difference on CX-5, larger in the back].

    Does anyone know why this is happening? Force distribution maybe, but why? There should normally be LESS force applied to the rears, no?
    My bet is it's part of the stability control. The rears get used far more than you think. Just a guess.

  8. #38
    i-ACTIV AWD Aficionado Kedis82ZE8's Avatar
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    I think stability control as well and/or the EBD. My Infiniti wears more on the rear as well.
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  9. #39
    Structural Member shadonoz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unobtanium View Post
    My bet is it's part of the stability control. The rears get used far more than you think. Just a guess.
    That's a good bet, I'll bet.

    Quote Originally Posted by Anchorman View Post
    Yes, quite right. On a one for one basis (considering only the size of the pads and the design forces of the calipers), the pads should wear out evenly. However, as the weight during a stop is always transferred to the front and that is constantly variable, the fronts get hotter and they wear out quicker. How fast the friction material wears is directly apportioned to heat and it is a non linear relationship, in other words, what ever the wear is at 300F isn’t doubled at 600F, it might be tripled or quadrupled. Pads need heat to make them work properly so low duty will make them sleep and high duty will excite them and make them perform best but wear quicker. Friction has nothing to do with area so you could literally cut an inch off each end of the pad and they will work exactly the same (more pressure per unit of area) but they will get hotter and in that case wear quicker.

    So back to the original question. If the rears wear quicker, it could be that the vehicle often has weight in the rear, the fronts aren’t doing what they should (maybe need servicing) and therefor push the work done to the rear or something is causing the rears to get hotter than they should like the calipers sticking slightly and they are dragging. There isn’t necessarily a fault though. It might be that the rear calipers have a lower threshold than the fronts (this is the amount of fluid pressure actually needed to bring the pads in contact with the disc) and they just apply marginally quicker but balance under heavier load. There may be slight differences on the pad compound (friction level). There is also a solid disc which may run slightly hotter than the vented one at the front - remember the fundamentals - the hotter the friction material, the quicker it wears. You can buy these point and read digital thermometers real cheap theses days that can tell the tale and they are very good for fault finding.
    OK then, too many variables to generalize. That would also account for the minority reporting faster wear on the fronts.

  10. #40
    i-ACTIV AWD Aficionado Kedis82ZE8's Avatar
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    I'm gonna throw a new hardware kit on the rear as well. OEM only about $14

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    Last edited by Kedis82ZE8; 04-09-2018 at 10:13 PM.
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  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by shadonoz View Post
    That's a good bet, I'll bet.



    OK then, too many variables to generalize. That would also account for the minority reporting faster wear on the fronts.
    I'd bet they take corners more sedately or live in flat areas. I know the cx5 has a very high threshold of "behind the scenes work" before anything illuminates on the dash regarding the various stability processes, and that we are provoking them a lot more than we think we are.

  12. #42
    Registered Member yrwei52's Avatar
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    Arrow How long did your brake pads last?

    Quote Originally Posted by shadonoz View Post
    I'm surprised so many rear brakes are wearing out before the fronts. I always thought that the fronts work harder, therefore wear out faster, due to weight transfer and greater weight on the front axle. Remember when cars had discs on the front and drums on the rear? And they often [usually?] have larger discs in front than back [but only 0.2" difference on CX-5, larger in the back].

    Does anyone know why this is happening? Force distribution maybe, but why? There should normally be LESS force applied to the rears, no?
    My theory is most late model vehicles are "designed" to wear out rear brakes faster. Earlier vehicles were having larger brakes at front and smaller brakes at rear due to the reason you described. Newer vehicles use EBD applying rear brakes more for light braking situation. But auto-makers don't want to put larger brakes at rear to extend the life-span due to mainly cost issue or sometimes the space limitation with parking brakes there. Small disc pads with more usage will make the life shorter. Hence we'll see much shorter rear pad life-span on many new vehicles.

    For our Mazda CX-5 there're some rust issues and lack of lubricant issues on caliper pins which contribute early replacement on rear pads. For some early CX-5 with new EPB there's issues on original rear calipers which can't release EPB properly and causes uneven and faster wear-out on rear pads.

    My 2001.5 VW Passat needed new set of rear brake pads and rotors at 45K miles while the front still had about 70% of pad's life left. On the the other hand my 2000 BMW 528i needed new set of front brake pads and rotors at 45K miles but the rear is still fine at current 61K miles. Of course BMW has dedicated small drum brakes at rear used only for parking brake which should prolong the rear pad's life.

    Then my 1998 Honda CR-V at 180,738 miles has gone through 3 sets of front pads, but the rear brake shoes are still original from factory! (boom03)

  13. #43
    Registered Member tibimakai's Avatar

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    That is, what I knew as well, the electronic brake distribution is shifting the braking power to the back, this way the car does not dip at the front, in case of a hard brake. It is safer.

  14. #44
    Registered Member Lbear's Avatar

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    I believe the brake pad issues were addressed and fixed for the 2017+ models

  15. #45
    Registered Member gdluke's Avatar

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    [QUOTE=Kedis82ZE8;6583721]I'm gonna throw a new hardware kit on the rear as well. OEM only about $14

    PN: K0Y12649ZA ('13-'15)

    Great idea! I've found that the hardware keeps the brakes from squeaking and sliding around. I learned from experience that the hardware is only good per each set, or else the stuff gets loose.

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