Toyo A36 in snow

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2019 cx-5 signature
Looks like we *re in for a snowy winter in CA.
I*ve been reading some reviews and I*m a bit concerned about the stock Toyo A36.
Anyone have feedback on their snow/cold performance?
I checked reviews here and not much specific about their snow/cold performance.
 
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2018 CX 5 Touring AWD
Ok in snow, beware of rear end kicking out going fast around 90 degree turns. Lifting off throttle brings it back in.
 
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CX5 GT-R
Looks like we *re in for a snowy winter in CA.
I*ve been reading some reviews and I*m a bit concerned about the stock Toyo A36.
Anyone have feedback on their snow/cold performance?
I checked reviews here and not much specific about their snow/cold performance.
Mine did decent in super light snow when brand new. They died in 17k miles though, and now I have LX25s. I have 8k miles on the lx25s with 8/32 left on all 4 at present, still.
 
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2019 Mazda CX-5 GTR
If you drive carefully and keep speeds reasonable for the conditions, the Toyos are fine. I got my GTR back last February and they got me through the winter with no problem.
 

Chris_Top_Her

Banned
Moderator
Contributor
L
San Antonio, Texas
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'15 CX-5 Miata AWD
Yeah, but continued speed may lead to pushing from the front. Mazda really should fix the weight dist. in these.
Sadly, it's more a result of the DSC. Proper fishtail/oversteer recovery techniques are actually hampered by the DSC. It will induce understeer strongly until you release the throttle even with the wheel at a high steering angle. It's ridiculous tbh. Imagine crashing becasuse stability control forces understeer on you lol.
 

Avoidin Deer

Central Virginia
Contributor
V
2019 CX-5 Reserve
Sadly, it's more a result of the DSC. Proper fishtail/oversteer recovery techniques are actually hampered by the DSC. It will induce understeer strongly until you release the throttle even with the wheel at a high steering angle. It's ridiculous tbh. Imagine crashing becasuse stability control forces understeer on you lol.
So if I'm in the snow, will shutting off the TCS (which takes the DCS with it) be a good idea or a very bad idea? I don't want to have the car wrest control from me at an inopportune time.

BTW, I found this detailed engineering drawing explaining exactly how the system works:
 
V
2019 cx-5 signature
If you drive carefully and keep speeds reasonable for the conditions, the Toyos are fine. I got my GTR back last February and they got me through the winter with no problem.
I will do one trip to Tahoe avoiding a major storm to see how the toyos handle and see if I should keep them around or just try to sell them. I learned my lesson a few years back on my wrx not to mess around with tires. I knowingly installed Bridgestones poorly rated for snow to save a couple of hundred bucks thinking I can compensate with my knowledge of winter driving (grew up in mass) and had an interesting trip to northstar. I was pretty much drifting sideways on 80.
 
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92 MX-3; 18 CX-5
The OE Toyo tires do pretty good even in snow with AWD and >7/32" of tread. Once you are in the 5/32" of tread range consider them bald for snow days. Obviously dedicated snow tires are the best option for winter driving, but there are some decent "all-weather" tires on the market that are essentially all-season that are optimized for snow. These newer all seasons get the 3 peak mountain snowflake symbol indicating they are rated for snow service. The advantage is that you don't have to change tires or have an extra set of wheels. The disadvantage is that you are driving year round on tires that share some things with dedicated snow tires: softer faster wearing rubber, compromised handling on warm and dry roads and sometimes a bit noisier than some other all season tires. Personally I don't consider the disadvantages to be too bad. And, several manufacturers are offering this newer style tire with 65K warranty, decent dry road handling and pretty quiet too. I have good experience with Nokian WR G4 on 2 different cars. Other than wearing a bit fast the compromise they made in their design suited me for the Northern Midwest winters and were adequate for my driving style when the roads were warm and dry. My only complaint was the tread depth after 40K was not adequate for snow service. Others worth a look: Firestone weathergrip, Goodyear weatherready and Michelin ?. Don't forget that you can use 235/55/19 as an alternative size. The Firestone weathergrip comes in that size, but not the original 225/55/19.
 
V
2019 cx-5 signature
The OE Toyo tires do pretty good even in snow with AWD and >7/32" of tread. Once you are in the 5/32" of tread range consider them bald for snow days. Obviously dedicated snow tires are the best option for winter driving, but there are some decent "all-weather" tires on the market that are essentially all-season that are optimized for snow. These newer all seasons get the 3 peak mountain snowflake symbol indicating they are rated for snow service. The advantage is that you don't have to change tires or have an extra set of wheels. The disadvantage is that you are driving year round on tires that share some things with dedicated snow tires: softer faster wearing rubber, compromised handling on warm and dry roads and sometimes a bit noisier than some other all season tires. Personally I don't consider the disadvantages to be too bad. And, several manufacturers are offering this newer style tire with 65K warranty, decent dry road handling and pretty quiet too. I have good experience with Nokian WR G4 on 2 different cars. Other than wearing a bit fast the compromise they made in their design suited me for the Northern Midwest winters and were adequate for my driving style when the roads were warm and dry. My only complaint was the tread depth after 40K was not adequate for snow service. Others worth a look: Firestone weathergrip, Goodyear weatherready and Michelin ?. Don't forget that you can use 235/55/19 as an alternative size. The Firestone weathergrip comes in that size, but not the original 225/55/19.
I ended up ordering BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport LT. I was really tempted to get a dedicated set of snow tires/wheels but I did the math on the number of chain control days and last 10 years and realized it's not practical. I can only recall a couple of R3 days (mandatory chains on all vehicles) and maybe 7-10 R2 days (chains on all non-AWD/4x4 with snow/m+s tires) and we tend to chase storms up to Tahoe. I can't recall ever having traction issues for my driving style except for the WRX/Bridgestone fiasco. BTW, they were Bridgestone RE790AS if I remember correctly. Don't ever run those on snow/winter conditions.
 
How do u like the weather grips when not in snow? Was debating between those and the conti truecontact tour, and went with the contis on our cx5.
 
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2019 Mazda CX 5 GT Turbo
They seem to be perfectly fine, no issues in rain, dry pavement the car is still quiet. I can't say I have any complaints. In 19 inch I think they weigh in at around 25 pounds so not overly heavy. I haven't noticed any ill effects on mpg either. I know in the snow they are considerably better than the Toyos especially for stopping distance on slick roads.
 
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2019 cx-5 signature
I drove through some light slush and uncleared packed snow and the toyos did fine. I felt one minor slip but I attribute that to the steering wheel giving great feedback. Didn*t really experience any ice. Just some brined wet pavement below freezing.
 

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