Stock Tire Life

Pitter

Pitter
Contributor
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2020 CX-5 Signature Azul Metalico
I suspect this has been asked before and I apologize if is a repeat question but what kind of tire life are people getting from the initial set of stock tires?
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
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Plano, Texas, USA
I suspect this has been asked before and I apologize if is a repeat question but what kind of tire life are people getting from the initial set of stock tires?
Which size?

If the OE tires are 17” road tires (CX-5 Sport、most Touring), they are Yokohama Geolandar G91A 225/65R17 100H tires which are rated at “280 B A” on UTQG and 44 psi maximum inflation pressure. 28K ~ 38K miles of tire life is expected.

If the OE tires are 19” road tires (CX-5 (some) Touring、Grand Touring、GT-Reserve、Signature), they are Toyo A36 225/55R19 99V tires which are rated at “300 A A” on UTQG and 51 psi maximum inflation pressure. 30K ~ 40K miles of tire life is expected.

Mine currently has 42K miles on Toyo A23 with 3/32” tread depth left.
 
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CX5 2018 GT
stock 225 55 19 toyo a36.
normal daily driving. At around 12500 miles (no rotation yet) fronts are at 6/32, rears 9/32. new tires I think are around 10.5/32

so assuming with 1 rotation now,
tires would be out somewhere around the low to mid 30000 miles mark - rough guess.
which is consistent with the 300 rating.
Hope this helps.
 
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erhayes

Contributor
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Mazda CX-5 FWD Touring
CX5 Touring with 17" 225/60 Geolander 91. I achieved ~ 28,000 before changing at 3/32 due to rainy season coming. Ed
 
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2017 Mazda CX-5 GT, 2016 Mazda6 iGT, 2014 Mazda3 sGT hatchback
I usually refer to the wear index of UTQ rating. You can compare relatively among tires. From my experience, 300 means 30K miles for my driving. Your mileage might vary.
 

HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
UTQG treadwear ratings are a rule of thumb to be used in the absence of other information but they can be misleading. These ratings are determined by the manufacturer and are not confirmed by any governmental testing. It is self-regulated in essense and there can be wide disparities between the treadwear rating and real world experience.

Consumer Reports, for example, tests tires for about 15,000 miles over real world roads and then projects an expected lifespan. For example, the 245/60R18 Michelin CrossClimate SUV with a treadwear rating of 680 and a treadwear warranty of 50,000 miles tested out as a 40,000 mile tire. The 245/60R18 Continental CrossContact LX25 with a treadwear rating of 740 and a treadwear warranty of 70,000 miles tested out as an 85,000 mile tire. Individual experiences will vary base on driving style, road conditions and other factors.

It's funny (or not) how many of the asphalt roads in Florida where I spend a couple of months every winter are oddly coarse. Evidently crushed sea shells are in the mix. In any case, a local Toyota service manager told me they often see OEM tires shot in the 20's of thousands of miles which I would attribute to the road surfaces.

If treadwear is a priority it's probably best to look for some independent testing beyond the treadwear rating.
 
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CX5 2018 GT
if one drives 20k+ miles per year, I get the 70k miles lifespan but for 12-15k per year thats 5-6 years on the same tires.
I personally wouldnt trust a 5+ years old tire which has been driven all those 5 years. Especially if in a hot climate. Tires rubber gets baked after so many years.
 
I replaced the stock 19" tires on my 2019 GTR at 49183 miles. One area of one tire was at the wear bar and my CX-5 was starting to feel unstable in the rain at highway speeds.
 
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Pueblo county CO
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CX-5 Sport 16.5 6M
It's funny (or not) how many of the asphalt roads in Florida where I spend a couple of months every winter are oddly coarse. Evidently crushed sea shells are in the mix. In any case, a local Toyota service manager told me they often see OEM tires shot in the 20's of thousands of miles which I would attribute to the road surfaces.
In Oregon I think they use coarse crushed lava rock imbeded in tar. Good for wet traction but really eats up tires.

I had good luck with my 17" OEM Geolanders. They lasted longer than any other new car OEM tires I've ever had, 42k.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
if one drives 20k+ miles per year, I get the 70k miles lifespan but for 12-15k per year thats 5-6 years on the same tires.
I personally wouldnt trust a 5+ years old tire which has been driven all those 5 years. Especially if in a hot climate. Tires rubber gets baked after so many years.
IMO 5-year-old tires should be perfectly fine to use. My factory Toyo A23’s are more than 5 years old now but I have no worries. Discount Tire Store won’t service any tires which is more than 10 years old. You will see the sign of rubber aged such as dry rot and the tires would become unsafe to use. So I’ll consider a new set of tires after 10 years of usage, especially in hot and DRY area, even if they still have plenty of tread left.
 
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Texas
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'19 MX-5, '20 CX-5
This morning, I rotated the stock Toyo A36 tires on my '20 CX-5 Signature for the first time at 8,022 miles. The tread depth started at 10/32". The fronts had 6/32". The rears had 9/32".

Based on a minimum required tread depth of 2/32" in Texas, I used half of the front's legal life in 8,000 miles.

If I rotate every 7,500 as suggested, the front tires will be slick at 22,500 miles and the rears will be down to 4/32".

If I rotate more frequently, I might be able to squeeze 25,000 out of them before they'll no longer pass inspection, but they'll become unsafe in the rain long before that. Wow.

I suspect the root cause is a heavy foot, 320 ft-lb of low-RPM torque, and an AWD system that can't send as much power to the rear wheels as the iVTM-4 system in my previous Hondas which wore tires much more evenly and less aggressively. :)

 
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