SkyActiv Oil Analysis Thread

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'15 6, '06 5
Remember that Amsoil says their Ea15K oil filters are only for 15k mile use. Their EaO filters are the 20k ones.
 
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16.5 CX-5 Tour/AWD
Remember that Amsoil says their Ea15K oil filters aren’t only for 15k mile use. Their EaO filters are the 20k ones.

I did take a look at that filter when I was searching through their website but it says it wasn't compatible with the CX-5 when I entered the vehicle information. I'm pretty sure it's because it's much longer and I have no idea if it even fits the CX-5 or not given the extra length.
 
I just do t myself ~ 6-7 k, used a Premium Bosch filter and Mobil 1 (blackstone labs guided/test) > Done...
Believe it or not...if you are on a tight budget Amazon Basics Oil ( API certifications ) is a high quality choice for the budget minded...
 
I know there's alternatives to make oil changes a bit easier (e.g. Fumoto, Stahlbus, EZ Valves) but then again, I would still need to drop the filter and replace it and IMO it kind of negates the reason to have a valve in the first place unless the filter is located inside the engine compartment like some vehicles.

It is much easier with a quick change valve. I can change the oil without a ramp. I have to put the car on a ramp on my first oil change because I couldn't get any leverage and space to take out the drain bolt. The filter is easier to get out than the drain plug.
 
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CX-9 GT 2019
As promised, just received the oil report from Blackstone this afternoon.

Came out great for 7664 mi, I usually don't go much more than this on my vehicles.

A little interesting in the way the comments were written, this time I ran the car for 45 min then left it sit for half hour or so to cool then changed oil, probably why fuel dilution disappeared this time.

Oil used was Ravenol 5w20 SFE.

View attachment 226523

Blackstone is well known as unreliable source for fuel dilution checks. There are references that they basically derive fuel dilution from flashpoint test. You can just ignore it and if you smell gas in oil - send it to Oil Analyzers. Please see my experience below:
Post showing differences between OilAnalyzers and Blackstone for oil dilution

However, by looking at mileage and viscosity - you are probably fine :)
 
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2014 CX-5 Touring
As I predicted in my last post/report, after 4K miles the oil level was down to the lower hole on the dipstick. Added a quart to bring it back up to the top mark. So the next time it's down a quart it should be time for my 8K mile oil change.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
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Plano, Texas, USA
As I predicted in my last post/report, after 4K miles the oil level was down to the lower hole on the dipstick. Added a quart to bring it back up to the top mark. So the next time it's down a quart it should be time for my 8K mile oil change.
If my 2.5L burns a quart of oil per 4K miles, I’d use 5W-30 oil trying to slow down the oil consumption.

F6337A07-E59A-417B-B6FE-197EEE987CED.jpeg

3C8848F3-0D6E-406F-9761-30953EF125BB.jpeg
 
Hey Guys,

Here is my oil analysis from my 16.5 CX-5 with 63k miles currently. I also posted this on BITOG

I'm hoping to run the Mobil M1-108A till it's approximately 18-19k miles before doing another analysis to see how the AMSOIL Signature 0W-20 is performing. Also, to clarify, I did not add any make up oil, I simply misread the question as "How much oil did you add into the engine after the change?"

7/25/20 (OLD) Setup:
Oil Used:
AMSOIL Signature 0W-20
Filter Used: AMSOIL EA15K12-EA

7/25/20 (NEW) Setup:
Oil Used:
AMSOIL Signature 0W-20
Filter Used: Mobil 1 M1-108A Extended Performance Oil Filter
View attachment 226811

I don't like that it thickened.
 
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2018 CX-5 Sport
As I predicted in my last post/report, after 4K miles the oil level was down to the lower hole on the dipstick. Added a quart to bring it back up to the top mark. So the next time it's down a quart it should be time for my 8K mile oil change.
How many miles has your car got on it?
 
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Southwest Ohio
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'19 CX-5 diesel
UOA report in from 2nd oil change on the 2019 diesel. The car happened to do a DPF regeneration cycle on the way home from work that day and finished just a few miles from home so I anticipated that there would be some fuel dilution and a lower flash point in this sample. No change in oil level throughout this run. Viscosity still shows low (but higher than last report) with this Mazda 0w30 diesel oil.
19 C5D-201008_2_2019 C5D 15k uoa report.jpg
 
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I would suggest to change your oil earlier (say 5000 miles) if you want to have many long years with the disel and change air filter every 2nd oil change. Especially if more of the driving is non higheway.
Good diesel fuel is a must as well, not sure how good US diesel is though for direct injection high pressure diesels in normal cars. the diesel has a fuel filter as well (cartridge) that is consumable.


The regen is done with the adblue or whatever mazda calls it not directly with more fuel. Basically inducing adblue and getting very high temp in the dpf to burn the soot that accumulates in it. Its all in the exhaust system. Bear in mind if you drive mostly in city more regens may happen and you may need more adblue sooner than later.

I also think you should have changed the first oil earlier to get all the metal crap parts out quicker.
What kills a lot of the disel cx5 engines in europe is the long oil change intervals and crappy oil and other diesel related crap that clogs the oil pump and the jets for the oil sprays on the bottom part of the engine eventually. Then no oil lubrication and things go south over time.
 
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Thank you for the test data. Its good that we keep this thread. I'll share mine on next oil change. starting this year I swtiched to every two oil changes and tracking since day 1 of the car as well. Although its not as interesting as yours. Its the only diesel we have.
 
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Southwest Ohio
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'19 CX-5 diesel
The regen is done with the adblue or whatever mazda calls it not directly with more fuel. Basically inducing adblue and getting very high temp in the dpf to burn the soot that accumulates in it. Its all in the exhaust system. Bear in mind if you drive mostly in city more regens may happen and you may need more adblue sooner than later.

Actually, the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) regeneration cycle ("regen") IS assisted by using more fuel in a "post injection strategy" to increase the Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) in an active regen. Some of that fuel ends up sticking to the cylinder walls due to the lower pressures/temperatures of the injection timing and then ends up making it's way past the rings and into the sump. Much of the fuel dilution in the oil "burns off" or evaporates after some time (depending on oil temperature and engine rpm). This phenomenon is why the fact that my car had just finished a regen cycle only a few miles before the sample was taken is a factor with the fuel dilution for this sample.

The DPF is the first thing downstream of the turbo (actually just behind the engine). The Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) is the gizmo that uses the Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF or "AdBlue") and is downstream of the DPF. It uses the DEF in a catalytic converter to reduce oxides of nitrogen during certain engine operating conditions (usually extended low speed/idle and high engine load conditions). The SCR may use more DEF when an active regen is going on, but it's a separate, downstream event that doesn't help clean the DPF. DEF cleans Nox out of the air, not Particulate Matter (PM) out of the DPF

Whew! that's a whole lotta letters!! lol ;)

Here's a little video that shows the basic system .....

 
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yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Actually, the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) regeneration cycle ("regen") IS assisted by using more fuel in a "post injection strategy" to increase the Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) in an active regen. Some of that fuel ends up sticking to the cylinder walls due to the lower pressures/temperatures of the injection timing and then ends up making it's way past the rings and into the sump. Much of the fuel dilution in the oil "burns off" or evaporates after some time (depending on oil temperature and engine rpm). This phenomenon is why the fact that my car had just finished a regen cycle only a few miles before the sample was taken is a factor with the fuel dilution for this sample.

The DPF is the first thing downstream of the turbo (actually just behind the engine). The Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) is the gizmo that uses the Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF or "AdBlue") and is downstream of the DPF. It uses the DEF in a catalytic converter to reduce oxides of nitrogen during certain engine operating conditions (usually extended low speed/idle and high engine load conditions). The SCR may use more DEF when an active regen is going on, but it's a separate, downstream event that doesn't help clean the DPF. DEF cleans Nox out of the air, not Particulate Matter (PM) out of the DPF

Whew! that's a whole lotta letters!! lol ;)

Here's a little video that shows the basic system .....

Yes, DPF regen does burn more fuel and bring down the fuel efficiency.
 
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2014 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech
I just do t myself ~ 6-7 k, used a Premium Bosch filter and Mobil 1 (blackstone labs guided/test) > Done...
Believe it or not...if you are on a tight budget Amazon Basics Oil ( API certifications ) is a high quality choice for the budget minded...

Just found out that Costco's oil is made by the same folks as Amazon's oil: Warren Oil Company. Right now Costco's 0W-20 full synthetic SN+ oil is $26.99 delivered for 2 5-quart jugs vs $22.99 for 1 5-quart jug of Amazon basics oil.
 
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