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Signature mpg

:
2019 CX-5 Signature
Here's my mileage for my Signature's first 2700mi:



It's actually averaging better MPG than my old 2014 CX-5 2.5L:



Not much winter driving in the new one though, which drastically lowers MPG.
 
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2014 CX-5 Touring
Type of driving makes a huge difference. When school is in, my wife sits in the pick-up line, engine idling, for as much as an HOUR each day. MPG for each tank usually comes in around 23.5 to 24 ('14 Touring 2.5L). But during summer or Christmas breaks with no school pick-up idling, the average is more like 27.5 to 28.5 MPG which is all in-town driving (no highway). And on road trips we've had it up over 30 on several occasions.
 
GTR owner, but averaging about 25-26 miles for 4 fill ups/1000 miles.

Really depends on how I drive. If I cruise along on highway speed limits I've had it up to 32 mpg for mainly highway trips (per computer). 15 mpg for stop and go or short trips (again per computer). Also tested out my turbo fun on the "32 mpg route" and averaged about 22.

Since I came from an economy class vehicle, I've been mainly driving gently for both engine break in and money saving. Have only filled with 87 thus far (10% ethanol. No choice for less regardless of fuel grade)
 
IMG_1693.png

~40 mile commute, mixed freeway, congested freeway, city streets (with well synchronized lights), adaptive cruise used when possible. Premium fuel.
 
Last edited:

Avoidin Deer

Zoom Zoom, baby
Contributor
:
Central Virginia
:
2019 CX-5 Reserve
I guess you*re going to need to start hypermiling.
Reminds me of my dad.

He had a penchant for offbeat cars (Nash Metropolitan, Vauxhaul, etc).

I recall riding to work with him. He would put the car in neutral when going downhill.

His workplace had a huge parking lot, and he would kill the ignition as soon as he turned into the place and dead-coast to his spot. It always cracked me up. But when you have 6 kids, I guess you either (a) economize whenever possible or (b) take any opportunity to give yourself the illusion of control.
 
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2019 CX-5 Sig Soul Red
FWIW - my MPG is calculated (by the car ) as 25. I only have 300 miles and filled the tank once. Other are saying the MPG calculated by the car are close. This is a mix of around town (not city per se) and highway, no cruise control. Also, not in Sport mode. I*m happy with this, but will begin to calculate my own MPG and report back in a few weeks.
 
4

40752

Reminds me of my dad.

He had a penchant for offbeat cars (Nash Metropolitan, Vauxhaul, etc).

I recall riding to work with him. He would put the car in neutral when going downhill.

His workplace had a huge parking lot, and he would kill the ignition as soon as he turned into the place and dead-coast to his spot. It always cracked me up. But when you have 6 kids, I guess you either (a) economize whenever possible or (b) take any opportunity to give yourself the illusion of control.
Thats a great memory.
 
:
2014 CX-5 Touring
Reminds me of my dad.

He had a penchant for offbeat cars (Nash Metropolitan, Vauxhaul, etc).

I recall riding to work with him. He would put the car in neutral when going downhill.
Which is ironic because neutral idling uses more fuel than in-gear throttle-closed when going down hill.
 

Avoidin Deer

Zoom Zoom, baby
Contributor
:
Central Virginia
:
2019 CX-5 Reserve
Which is ironic because neutral idling uses more fuel than in-gear throttle-closed when going down hill.
Really???

I had no idea. I'm not disputing it, but never miss the chance to learn something new.

How is that? Does that apply to all fuel delivery technologies (carb/injection)?
 
:
2014 CX-5 Touring
I know it applies to fuel injection. The injectors shut off when the throttle is closed (full vacuum) and car is still in gear, because the car's momentum keeps the engine turning. If you look at your instant MPG readout, you'll see it go to 99+ when you let off the gas pedal.

I'm not as familiar with carb systems, but I would think that a similar thing happens, because otherwise you'd be flooding the engine with fuel when decelerating in gear. However doing some searching it looks like going into neutral while decelerating in a carb'd engine would use less fuel, although it's still unsafe.
 

Avoidin Deer

Zoom Zoom, baby
Contributor
:
Central Virginia
:
2019 CX-5 Reserve
However doing some searching it looks like going into neutral while decelerating in a carb'd engine would use less fuel, although it's still unsafe.
The car my dad had at the time was a '65 Beetle that had been bored out and had an electronic ignition system installed by the prior owner. In order to keep the tricked-out engine cool, it had an oil filter installed to increase the capacity. It was pretty quick for a Beetle, but still handled like a wheel barrow.

I was going to put in my original comment that the idea of being in motion while out-of-gear, and/or with the engine turned off is not something I will be doing anything soon. But this was back in the day when he would go to work early and there were way fewer humans around.
 

shadonoz

SkyActiv Member
Contributor
:
State of Jefferson
:
2017 CX-5 GT AWD+
He would put the car in neutral when going downhill.
Which is ironic because neutral idling uses more fuel than in-gear throttle-closed when going down hill.
I never thought about that, but it makes sense.

Reminds me of my old 1961 Saab 96. It had a feature called "free-wheeling". When you'd lift off the throttle, the transmission [3 on the tree] would disengage [internal clutch?] and the car would coast. It was seamless. Eliminated engine braking. And it was optional: you'd turn it on or off with a pull lever down under the dash.

Crazy!

With a carb, the fuel delivery should be the same, gear engaged or not. But eliminating engine braking might decrease gas consumption a minuscule amount.
 

Avoidin Deer

Zoom Zoom, baby
Contributor
:
Central Virginia
:
2019 CX-5 Reserve
Reminds me of my old 1961 Saab 96. It had a feature called "free-wheeling". When you'd lift off the throttle, the transmission [3 on the tree] would disengage [internal clutch?] and the car would coast. It was seamless. Eliminated engine braking. And it was optional: you'd turn it on or off with a pull lever down under the dash.
That's pretty cool. I've never heard of that. I learned to drive on a column shift station wagon. Kinda like push-button transmissions...now you see 'em/now you don't.

I had a '59 Bugeye Sprite with a Stebro free flow exhaust. I never put it in neutral when coming downhill because I liked the crop duster sound it made when I let the engine slow me down. What it lacked in speed it more than made up for in decibels.
 

shadonoz

SkyActiv Member
Contributor
:
State of Jefferson
:
2017 CX-5 GT AWD+
AD, I wonder how much the 1/2 mile dirt driveway you mentioned elsewhere has to do with your lower than expected FE. That's one mile of slow 2nd gear every time you take it out.
 

Avoidin Deer

Zoom Zoom, baby
Contributor
:
Central Virginia
:
2019 CX-5 Reserve
AD, I wonder how much the 1/2 mile dirt driveway you mentioned elsewhere has to do with your lower than expected FE. That's one mile of slow 2nd gear every time you take it out.
That's a really good question. I never really thought about it. I do creep along it, although I would have thought that the nearly total lack of traffic and stop signs would have more than made up for it.

I'll have to pay attention to the real-time MPG gauge next time I leave the compound.
 
4

40752

I never thought about that, but it makes sense.

Reminds me of my old 1961 Saab 96. It had a feature called "free-wheeling". When you'd lift off the throttle, the transmission [3 on the tree] would disengage [internal clutch?] and the car would coast. It was seamless. Eliminated engine braking. And it was optional: you'd turn it on or off with a pull lever down under the dash.

Crazy!

With a carb, the fuel delivery should be the same, gear engaged or not. But eliminating engine braking might decrease gas consumption a minuscule amount.
I have a 1940 Packard with original overdrive 3 on the tree transmission that freewheels when the overdrive is engaged. If you want engine braking you have to disengage the overdrive. It works flawlessly. Borg Warner built the overdrives back in the 30s.
 

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