2013~2016 Shocks/Struts?

ColoradoDriver

Gen-1 Kodo Design
Contributor
L
Denver, CO
V
2014 CX-5 Touring
My 2014 CX-5 has about 87,600 miles now. I'm noticing that the past week there has been some bounciness on portions of my drive that doesn't feel normal.

Made me think maybe the shocks/struts are going out?

I actually don't know what the difference is between shocks and struts. Can someone help me on that front? Are those different parts?

How hard of a job would it be to replace these?

And is there a good way for me to test these parts to see if they are indeed shot?
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg. Plano, TX
Contributor
My 2014 CX-5 has about 87,600 miles now. I'm noticing that the past week there has been some bounciness on portions of my drive that doesn't feel normal.

Made me think maybe the shocks/struts are going out?

I actually don't know what the difference is between shocks and struts. Can someone help me on that front? Are those different parts?

How hard of a job would it be to replace these?

And is there a good way for me to test these parts to see if they are indeed shot?
Shock absorber is a telescopic damper device to prevent the suspension spring bouncing when it gets compressed. In old days shock absorber is a independent component attached to the suspension parts. Newer vehicles started to combine spring and shock absorber into one unit, base on MacPherson strut used at the front suspension many years ago (1940+?) for its simplicity and compact size. So the strut is a component consists spring and shock absorber into a one unit. Usually strut is only referring to telescopic damper part which has to custom made to fit the design of spring、suspension、and steering if it used at front.

So shock absorber is in universal shape and they all are looks alike. Strut is custom made and more complex in shape, but still serve as a telescopic damper.

Usually theres a bounce test to check shock absorbers. If you push the front or rear end down and release it, the car bounces more than once, it indicates the shock absorbers are weak.

If you see any leaks, shock or strut replacement on the same axle should be considered.
 

ColoradoDriver

Gen-1 Kodo Design
Contributor
L
Denver, CO
V
2014 CX-5 Touring
Shock absorber is a telescopic damper device to prevent the suspension spring bouncing when it gets compressed. In old days shock absorber is a independent component attached to the suspension parts. Newer vehicles started to combine spring and shock absorber into one unit, base on MacPherson strut used at the front suspension many years ago (1940+?) for its simplicity and compact size. So the strut is a component consists spring and shock absorber into a one unit. Usually strut is only referring to telescopic damper part which has to custom made to fit the design of spring*suspension*and steering if it used at front.

So shock absorber is in universal shape and they all are looks alike. Strut is custom made and more complex in shape, but still serve as a telescopic damper.

Usually there*s a bounce test to check shock absorbers. If you push the front or rear end down and release it, the car bounces more than once, it indicates the shock absorbers are weak.

If you see any leaks, shock or strut replacement on the same axle should be considered.
Awesome, thanks. I'll give that a test.
 

shadonoz

SkyActiv Member
Contributor
L
State of Jefferson
V
2017 CX-5 GT AWD+
I always considered struts to be a structural components AND dampers, whereas shocks were just dampers. That may no longer always be true.
 
V
Mazda CX-5
A shock absorber is a motion damper that controls the speed of the wheel's motion. Typically a sealed tube, filled with oil and a piston that moves up and down, retarded by the oil.

A McPherson strut is also an oil-filled damper, but is also a structural part of the suspension, replacing the upper control arm, with sacrifices in suspension performance in return for simplicity and price.




Replacing the struts in the front requires a spring compressor that will injure you if used incorrectly. It is not a beginner's task.
 
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