• Welcome to Mazdas247, the 24/7 Mazda Community and Resource. Learn about the benefits of becoming a Member here.
  • We're an Amazon Associate and eBay Partner. We earn from qualifying purchases.

Radar Cruise Control

:
2019 CX-5 Signature
RACC uses the camera below 20mph as does the SBS. The automation wasn't happy, gave up, and informed you. ...
I will quote the above, as it is really all that was needed and is correct.

I hope the OP is not as stupid as some are implying. RCC is a great feature that eliminates the need to constantly brake when you approach a slower vehicle from behind. It is not meant to replace common sense.
 

Avoidin Deer

Zoom Zoom, baby
Contributor
:
Central Virginia
:
2019 CX-5 Reserve
REALLY? In my 2019 CX-5 i can switch adaptive cruise control to normal cruise control?
From the 2019 Owner's Manual, Pg 4-153
Switching to cruise control function
When the MODE switch is pressed until the system switches to the cruise main indication (white) while the MRCC with Stop & Go function system is turned on, the system switches to the cruise control function. When the system switches to the cruise control function, the indicator and multi-information display notify the driver as follows:
>The MRCC with Stop & Go function set indication (green) or the MRCC with Stop & Go function main indication (white) is turned off, and the cruise main indication (white) is turned on.
>A message is displayed in the multi-information display.
 

Avoidin Deer

Zoom Zoom, baby
Contributor
:
Central Virginia
:
2019 CX-5 Reserve
Thanks Man. I can't wait to check this out in the car!
I'll expose my ignorance here, and maybe I'm not thinking clearly...under what circumstances would regular Cruise Control be superior to MRCC?

I like MRCC because I don't have to try to do an "exact match" on the speed of the guy in front of me. The only downsides are during sudden changes in the state of things that are/aren't in front of me. In other words, when a car pulls in front of me, MRCC can slow down too dramatically. And when the guy is no longer in front of me (I pull around or he changes lanes), MRCC might accelerate a little too aggressively, depending on what Max Speed I have set.

I'm trying to imagine how regular CC might be an improvement in those (or any other) situations. When might I prefer it?
 

dwm

2019 CX-5 Signature Soul Red
I'll expose my ignorance here, and maybe I'm not thinking clearly...under what circumstances would regular Cruise Control be superior to MRCC?

I like MRCC because I don't have to try to do an "exact match" on the speed of the guy in front of me. The only downsides are during sudden changes in the state of things that are/aren't in front of me. In other words, when a car pulls in front of me, MRCC can slow down too dramatically. And when the guy is no longer in front of me (I pull around or he changes lanes), MRCC might accelerate a little too aggressively, depending on what Max Speed I have set.

I'm trying to imagine how regular CC might be an improvement in those (or any other) situations. When might I prefer it?
I do allot of highway driving. As a courtesy to others I try to stay out of the left lane so others can pass me if they want. So I tend to stay in the middle lane unless I need to pass.

So lets say I'm in the middle lane doing 75 MPH and traffic in front is doing the same or faster. If traffic in front of me gradually slows down to say 64 MPH, the adaptive cruise control follows suit but because it is so gradual it may take me some time to realize I have slowed down to 64 MPH when I could have easily pulled into the left lane to pass this slower traffic. I actually get lulled into going slower than I want to and for that reason I prefer "regular" cruise control. If I begin to come closer to to decelerating traffic and I can change lanes, I do to keep my speed constant. In heavy traffic, that is a different story. I then prefer the adaptive cruise control. Glad I know how to switch now!
 

Avoidin Deer

Zoom Zoom, baby
Contributor
:
Central Virginia
:
2019 CX-5 Reserve
I do allot of highway driving. As a courtesy to others I try to stay out of the left lane so others can pass me if they want. So I tend to stay in the middle lane unless I need to pass.

So lets say I'm in the middle lane doing 75 MPH and traffic in front is doing the same or faster. If traffic in front of me gradually slows down to say 64 MPH, the adaptive cruise control follows suit but because it is so gradual it may take me some time to realize I have slowed down to 64 MPH when I could have easily pulled into the left lane to pass this slower traffic. I actually get lulled into going slower than I want to and for that reason I prefer "regular" cruise control. If I begin to come closer to to decelerating traffic and I can change lanes, I do to keep my speed constant. In heavy traffic, that is a different story. I then prefer the adaptive cruise control. Glad I know how to switch now!
I get it. That makes perfect sense.

As I've said...different driving environments assign different values to these features.
 

Avoidin Deer

Zoom Zoom, baby
Contributor
:
Central Virginia
:
2019 CX-5 Reserve
When snow/sleet covers the radar and prevents it from working. And too lazy to stop the car and brush it off. :)
Hmmmm.....the manual says you turn on the MRCC system, the hit MODE again to cycle to the regular Cruise Control.

I wonder if you can do that (actually cycle through the different steps) when the MRCC system is disabled due to blocked radar.
 

Ronzuki

South Central PA
:
2018 CX5 Touring
:
w/ Pref Pkg
I like MRCC because I don't have to try to do an "exact match" on the speed of the guy in front of me. The only downsides are during sudden changes in the state of things that are/aren't in front of me. In other words, when a car pulls in front of me, MRCC can slow down too dramatically. And when the guy is no longer in front of me (I pull around or he changes lanes), MRCC might accelerate a little too aggressively, depending on what Max Speed I have set.
No ignorance here...you are aware of its many shortcomings as stated above. Most notably, complete lack of peripheral situational awareness. That one alone would require your high-dollar systems to be involved, which the average distracted-driver assist systems are obviously not equipped with. Meaning, you can't afford it. And if you could afford to buy it, you wouldn't be able to afford maintaining and calibrating it. Calibration...that's another automotive automation topic the auto engineering wizards don't seem to understand (yet), but we'll get to that in later discussions, I'm sure.

I'm trying to imagine how regular CC might be an improvement in those (or any other) situations. When might I prefer it?
Again, you are aware of RACC's design failures and utilize it accordingly, so you really wouldn't prefer std. CC over RACC. It's the other users who are clueless about such things that will no-doubt misconstrue RACC, combined w/ LKA, as a quazi-auto-pilot. Let's, for sake of argument, call it the infamous Tesla auto pilot (take a nap, surf the web, play a game...). That, quite obviously, is where we're headed with all of this non-sense, correct? And then there's 'issues'. Let's call these issues what they are, for the sake of argument...negligent wrecks.

Regular CC is an improvement for those types of operators, because it is simple and standardized: get to speed, set speed, car stays at that speed, period. RACC and the like merely gives those irresponsible operators above yet more tools with which to be distracted. Everyone knows how std. CC works. One must still drive the car, pay attention to what's going on around them, react to situations, and operate their vehicle. People can easily be lulled into believing that RACC, or any of this stuff, can do more than it is capable of...especially under adverse exceptions.
 

Ronzuki

South Central PA
:
2018 CX5 Touring
:
w/ Pref Pkg
I actually get lulled into going slower than I want to and for that reason I prefer "regular" cruise control.
And there it is...the distraction assist. I've experienced this as well...and that would mean I was operating my machine distracted and not paying attention.

I prefer RACC on the straighter 2-lane state roads at the lower speeds 35-50mph. It does a good job of delivering better over-all fuel economy on my daily commutes than I do most weeks w/ my right foot. Highway speeds, I don't use RACC at all due to the speeds and its non-existent peripheral awareness. I'll use std. CC if it's not too crowded. At highway speeds I'm driving thus I'm paying attention to what's going on all around me.
 
And there it is...the distraction assist. I've experienced this as well...and that would mean I was operating my machine distracted and not paying attention.

I prefer RACC on the straighter 2-lane state roads at the lower speeds 35-50mph. It does a good job of delivering better over-all fuel economy on my daily commutes than I do most weeks w/ my right foot. Highway speeds, I don't use RACC at all due to the speeds and its non-existent peripheral awareness. I'll use std. CC if it's not too crowded. At highway speeds I'm driving thus I'm paying attention to what's going on all around me.
This is a glass half empty view. To claim people who use Mazdas Radar CC are essentially "distracted drivers" is bs. You have also talked ill about blind side warning and other driver assists.

Go back and look at aviation. No question overall safety in the sky has massively been aided by computer systems in the last 30+ years.

I would feel much safer on the roads knowing all cars around me were functioning with driver aids on. Cant even tell you how many people just today on the highway drove wrecklessly in full "MANUAL" human mode. Its not even close in terms of safer driving frankly.

If the driver is properly using Mazdas radar CC, they will maintain a safe distance and safe lane changes. (Mazdas BSM system is very cautious) A huge improvement over all the manual drivers cutting off each other forcing white knuckle moments.
 

Ronzuki

South Central PA
:
2018 CX5 Touring
:
w/ Pref Pkg
Go back and look at aviation. No question overall safety in the sky has massively been aided by computer systems in the last 30+ years.
Yes, I've looked at automation of many many things over the past 30 years. The question is have you, really? I've been automating people right out of their jobs for that long as well. Sorry to inform you, but we've pretty much hit the apex of "aided by" and crossed over to the dark side of 'automation knows best' realm, in all sectors. When a commercial airline pilot, who actually is capable of the act of flying aircraft, tells me he's tired of fighting against the planes trying to kill him (and retires, early), what do you believe that to mean?
How many times must this comparison be made in these discussions...do you really know and completely understand why an entire fleet of (half-azzed) over-automated aircraft are still sitting on the ground? First and foremost, short answer, they got caught being stupid, greedy, and cheap. Aside from that, there's not enough time for me to beat the hell out of my keyboard to educate you technically.

If the driver is properly using Mazdas radar CC, they will...
This is rich..."if the driver"... haha, big frigging IF. Please, remove head from sand. If all of the dead Tesla passengers (they weren't driving so we can't refer to them as drivers...possibly operators) were properly using the auto-pilot... that Elon says isn't an auto-pilot... Haha...
Well, your honor, if the operator hadn't stuck his hand in the machine's, moving parts, he wouldn't haven't lost it. That'll go over real well, wouldn't you say?

My job as an automation engineer is to look at glasses 3/4 empty. If I don't, some moron will always think the glass is full, the world is perfect, and then it's my azz and others in similar positions that are put to blame. Certainly not the negligent operators, god-forbid. Unfortunately, looking at the glasses as they should viewed takes time and costs money, therefore, your perceived safety of the automation kinda-sorta goes by the wayside more often than not. You, Mr. Consumer, won't truly know this because I, Mr. Manufacturer, don't want you to. It's really that simple. Of course, you don't seem to understand, because if you did, you wouldn't be making such statements.

Here's my recommendation,... You don't want to drive a car anymore, fine, that's your prerogative. Move to a city and ride a bus, train, or subway. Mass transit is your friend. Leave the roads to people that don't want to be chauffeured around by automation or pay for its constraints. That's what automation is, a series of constraints. And please, quit thinking that this low-budget automotive over-automation is the answer to all of our safety problems, because I'm here to tell you, it's a fool's errand.
 
:
2019 Mazda CX-5 GTR
I love driving, but hate commuting. RACC does an amazing job of making my commute more bearable. Yes, it will bring my GTR to a complete stop as needed. Yes, it maximizes fuel efficiency. Yes, it keeps me from dealing with the stop & go traffic as I get closer to my office.

Yes, it disables itself under 20mph when the front sensor is covered in snow, but you know what??? I don't see myself using CC at all when it's snowing!

As to paying attention, I consider myself to be a very focused driver. With the HUD I am always aware of what speed I traveling at, regardless of whether RACC is on or off.
 
Yes, I've looked at automation of many many things over the past 30 years. The question is have you, really? I've been automating people right out of their jobs for that long as well. Sorry to inform you, but we've pretty much hit the apex of "aided by" and crossed over to the dark side of 'automation knows best' realm, in all sectors. When a commercial airline pilot, who actually is capable of the act of flying aircraft, tells me he's tired of fighting against the planes trying to kill him (and retires, early), what do you believe that to mean?
How many times must this comparison be made in these discussions...do you really know and completely understand why an entire fleet of (half-azzed) over-automated aircraft are still sitting on the ground? First and foremost, short answer, they got caught being stupid, greedy, and cheap. Aside from that, there's not enough time for me to beat the hell out of my keyboard to educate you technically.



This is rich..."if the driver"... haha, big frigging IF. Please, remove head from sand. If all of the dead Tesla passengers (they weren't driving so we can't refer to them as drivers...possibly operators) were properly using the auto-pilot... that Elon says isn't an auto-pilot... Haha...
Well, your honor, if the operator hadn't stuck his hand in the machine's, moving parts, he wouldn't haven't lost it. That'll go over real well, wouldn't you say?

My job as an automation engineer is to look at glasses 3/4 empty. If I don't, some moron will always think the glass is full, the world is perfect, and then it's my azz and others in similar positions that are put to blame. Certainly not the negligent operators, god-forbid. Unfortunately, looking at the glasses as they should viewed takes time and costs money, therefore, your perceived safety of the automation kinda-sorta goes by the wayside more often than not. You, Mr. Consumer, won't truly know this because I, Mr. Manufacturer, don't want you to. It's really that simple. Of course, you don't seem to understand, because if you did, you wouldn't be making such statements.

Here's my recommendation,... You don't want to drive a car anymore, fine, that's your prerogative. Move to a city and ride a bus, train, or subway. Mass transit is your friend. Leave the roads to people that don't want to be chauffeured around by automation or pay for its constraints. That's what automation is, a series of constraints. And please, quit thinking that this low-budget automotive over-automation is the answer to all of our safety problems, because I'm here to tell you, it's a fool's errand.
You have a very extreme view of driver/safety aids. That's your choice to enable or disable them.
Just go ahead and observe what happens around you in the real world.....I see MUCH poorer examples of 100% human manual driving then if safety aides are being used. Perhaps its because I drive hundreds of miles per week for my job and am a defensive driver, but its not even close.

The problem with your attacks on safety aids is you disregard all human error from the view.

I'll stand totally behind my belief the aids Mazda has incorporated are a GOOD thing and not some half baked system that makes driving more dangerous.
 

dwm

2019 CX-5 Signature Soul Red
And there it is...the distraction assist. I've experienced this as well...and that would mean I was operating my machine distracted and not paying attention.

I prefer RACC on the straighter 2-lane state roads at the lower speeds 35-50mph. It does a good job of delivering better over-all fuel economy on my daily commutes than I do most weeks w/ my right foot. Highway speeds, I don't use RACC at all due to the speeds and its non-existent peripheral awareness. I'll use std. CC if it's not too crowded. At highway speeds I'm driving thus I'm paying attention to what's going on all around me.
When I said "
I actually get lulled into going slower than I want to and for that reason I prefer "regular" cruise control." I am not in any way distracted by RAAC or do I think it aids distraction. I have the HUD and stay alert to road conditions. The problem is that following traffic that is GRADUALLY slowing down is sometimes imperceptible due to the smooth ride and the fact that RAAC is also accurate in maintaining a set distance. I prefer to SEE that I am gaining on slowing traffic and make the decision to slow down myself or pass the traffic and therefore like standard cruise control on long distance highway trips. I think RAAC is great in stop and go traffic or where there are traffic jams on a highway trip or commute trip.
 
:
2014 & 2019 CX-5 Touring(s)
When I said "
I actually get lulled into going slower than I want to and for that reason I prefer "regular" cruise control." I am not in any way distracted by RAAC or do I think it aids distraction. I have the HUD and stay alert to road conditions. The problem is that following traffic that is GRADUALLY slowing down is sometimes imperceptible due to the smooth ride and the fact that RAAC is also accurate in maintaining a set distance. I prefer to SEE that I am gaining on slowing traffic and make the decision to slow down myself or pass the traffic and therefore like standard cruise control on long distance highway trips. I think RAAC is great in stop and go traffic or where there are traffic jams on a highway trip or commute trip.
I completely agree with this - both the occurrence and that it does not imply distraction.
 

Ronzuki

South Central PA
:
2018 CX5 Touring
:
w/ Pref Pkg
You have a very extreme view of driver/safety aids. That's your choice to enable or disable them.
Just go ahead and observe what happens around you in the real world.....I see MUCH poorer examples of 100% human manual driving then if safety aides are being used. Perhaps its because I drive hundreds of miles per week for my job and am a defensive driver, but its not even close.

The problem with your attacks on safety aids is you disregard all human error from the view.

I'll stand totally behind my belief the aids Mazda has incorporated are a GOOD thing and not some half baked system that makes driving more dangerous.
First, I'll ask again, who is deeming these novelties as safety rated? There are very specific criteria involved in automation to imply, deem, or install systems rated as such. I see zero evidence that any of these systems comply with any regulatory body certifying this garbage as 'safety' rated. So please, cease referring to this "stuff" as safety! You are spreading mis-information.

I have a very realistic view of what automation does to any skill set in the REAL world. It promotes the human error you and everyone else are so concerned about, like it or not, want it or not. You apparently aren't getting it...the more humans do not do anything for themselves, the less capable they become at the task, any task, should they need to. The more nanny-minders added to cars, the worse the operator's driving skills become at executing the task, because they don't have to...until they must. Too late. As I say I've been involved in every level of automation for far longer than the automotive world has thought about it. I've designed it, programmed it, installed it, commissioned it, fought with it, lived w/ it, trained operators how to use it, taught maintenance on how to troubleshoot and fix it, and most importantly, in all that time, observed and learned what tech works what doesn't, when automation provides beneficial assistance, and under what circumstances and when it doesn't. Experience. Just because you can doesn't mean you should. I've lived the results, the re-designs, the expense, the lawyers, all to fix stupid. It's a viscous cycle that can't be won. Throw in schedules, budgets and profitability into the equation, and you end up w/ half-baked systems more times than not. You're attempting to explain to me that which I've already been experiencing my entire working career. I'm attempting to open YOUR eyes to the reality.

The real problem no one is addressing, here or elsewhere, is: what are all of the operators to do when the automation fails because their skills, well, suck? Oh yeah...it's called crash. What happens to an aircraft when the automation fails (or was efed right from the start) and the operators in the planes (no longer pilots since they really don't fly the things anymore) really don't have the experience to fly the plane, or as we are beginning to see in the spotlight, simply can't because the designs are overly reliant on the automation to keep the plane in the air? Oh yeah...crash.

I agree, I see the degredation of human driving skills every day as well (don't know how exactly you would know who is driving 100% manual, or not, distracted, or not). I sit behind people daily sitting at lights not moving, holding up traffic, because they're pre-occupioed looking at their dumb-phone. People can't back out of my driveway w/o weaving all over the place, even w/ a back-up camera. Then there's that...tech can't fix the real problems here. This poor performance is being supported by distraction promoting technologies (because all that marketing crap sells cars, phones etc.).

Ever go to a store and hand someone additional change along w/ the larger bills to get an even dollar in return as opposed to a handful of change? You know, after they've already prematurely keyed in the cash tendered? The results for any task are the same...brain freeze, can't comprehend, they give up, and storm off to go find the manger. 15-20 years ago I used to think it was funny. Not anymore. Technology isn't going to fix that. The cash register is progress technology that has assisted in turning our brains to mush. Then we get to my age and I have to hear about brain exercises...that's funny in terms of human progress wouldn't you agree?


When I said "
I actually get lulled into going slower than I want to and for that reason I prefer "regular" cruise control." I am not in any way distracted by RAAC or do I think it aids distraction. I have the HUD and stay alert to road conditions. The problem is that following traffic that is GRADUALLY slowing down is sometimes imperceptible due to the smooth ride and the fact that RAAC is also accurate in maintaining a set distance. I prefer to SEE that I am gaining on slowing traffic and make the decision to slow down myself or pass the traffic and therefore like standard cruise control on long distance highway trips. I think RAAC is great in stop and go traffic or where there are traffic jams on a highway trip or commute trip.
Agreed. Only difference, my car doesn't have a HUD. I've mentioned this little automation issue before as well...lack of automotive automation standardization. It's a problem from an automation perspective. So your HUD isn't there or stops working, now were equal. Your foot and brain aren't connected to the throttle and you're gaining or slowing w/o conscious awareness. Foot and Brain are the human I/O and processor which is now not controlling the task. OK. but you are technically distracted, your thoughts are elsewhere because your brain isn't focused on the act of driving. I realize it is happening after the fact as well when I'm utilizing the RACC.
 
:
Ottawa, Ontario
:
17 Mazda 6 GT
Ever go to a store and hand someone additional change along w/ the larger bills to get an even dollar in return as opposed to a handful of change? You know, after they've already prematurely keyed in the cash tendered? The results for any task are the same...brain freeze, can't comprehend, they give up, and storm off to go find the manager. 15-20 years ago I used to think it was funny. Not anymore. Technology isn't going to fix that. The cash register is progress technology that has assisted in turning our brains to mush. Then we get to my age and I have to hear about brain exercises...that's funny in terms of human progress wouldn't you agree?
Oh ya, been there.
Not that long ago I was buying some small items at a grocery store, and the cashier was a young girl, probably still in her teens.
She rang up my small purchase and keyed in what she thought I was tendering.
I then added 26 cents to my tender, to round out the change coming back to me.
She totally panicked and freaked out. She had no idea what to do, and even though I tried to help her, she actually started crying.
A manager had to come over to settle her down and help with the math.
She was 100% relying on the cash register to do the calculations.
I was stunned to be honest. I know basic math skills are not taught in schools anymore, but didn't realize how bad it could be.
 

Latest posts

Top