Question about disabling cylinder deactivation on a 2020 CX-5

Hello,
I have been reading the forum for a while but never posted. I was hoping to get some guidance from the experts here. I have a 2020 CX5 GT I bought new and other than the uncomfortable as $%# seats I like the car, its my 5th Mazda and 3rd CX-5. This one has the cylinder deactivation which along with the stop/start systems on other cars I do not like or want. From what I can find online it sounds like it is the same 2 cylinders that get deactivated and I find it hard to believe there isn't some sort of uneven wear between the 2 sets of cylinders over time.

My question is...Is there a way for someone knowledgeable in tuning to disable the cylinder deactivation? If so would it cause any other issues with the engine? I know nothing at all about tuning or modding so would prefer someone who knows what they are doing...A shop or something. The shifting points on this car suck as well, being in 5th gear at 30mph is a joke so I spend a lot of time on the paddle shifters or in manual mode.

Anyway...I truly appreciate and advice or info anyone has. I did search forums and do see offers to tune but none mention disabling cylinder deactivation.
 

CarpeDiem

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I’ve owned three vehicles with cylinder deactivation - but none were Mazdas. There was no indication of abnormal wear on any of the cylinders. This is a mature technology in the industry and if this was an issue it would be well reported since the first applications over a decade ago. It isn’t a real concern regardless what we may think. There was lots of discussion about deactivation on this thread:

 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
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Plano, Texas, USA
I’ve owned three vehicles with cylinder deactivation - but none were Mazdas. There was no indication of abnormal wear on any of the cylinders. This is a mature technology in the industry and if this was an issue it would be well reported since the first applications over a decade ago. It isn’t a real concern regardless what we may think. There was lots of discussion about deactivation on this thread:

Cylinder deactivation definitely is far from a “mature” technology otherwise every car manufacture would use it in every engine they manufactured. The theory is problematic as the pistons on deactivated cylinders are still running passively which will have to compress the air inside with valves closed. This means the energy is wasted by doing such which offsets the fuel saving by these deactivated cylinders. The thermal effect will change rapidly between transition states which will affect the engine wear in the long run. You can Google it and see how many problems from cylinder deactivation, and how many class-action lawsuits associated with it.

For Mazda, CD is a new design for 2018 MY, and they have added many additional components in engine, transmission, and even the exhaust system for the system. The benefit of all of this complexity is 0 ~ 1 mpg on EPA fuel economy ratings. On the other hand since Mazda “secretly” added cylinder deactivation for 2018 MY on 2.5L, they have issued 1 major safety recall, and at least 3 TSBs and Service Alerts related to cylinder deactivation.
 

CarpeDiem

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Cylinder deactivation is far from a “mature” technology otherwise every car manufacture would use it in every engine they manufacture...

Wow, how did you come up with that? So by your own definition turbocharging, direct injection, hybrid drives and variable valve timing aren’t “mature” technologies either. How about four-wheel-drive, is it not a “mature” technology?

You can google all day long if you want and see far more class-action lawsuits on much more common issues than on cylinder deactivation - leaking fuel tanks, brake malfunctions, failing transmissions, ad nauseum. I have better things to do.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
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Plano, Texas, USA
Wow, how did you come up with that? So by your own definition turbocharging, direct injection, hybrid drives and variable valve timing aren’t “mature” technologies either. How about four-wheel-drive, is it not a “mature” technology?

You can google all day long if you want and see far more class-action lawsuits on much more common issues than on cylinder deactivation - leaking fuel tanks, brake malfunctions, failing transmissions, ad nauseum. I have better things to do.
You’re trying to compare apples to oranges. Cylinder deactivation is a fuel saving feature but others in your examples like turbo-charging and AWD are not. Direct injection and variable valve timing are fuel saving features making engine more efficient (more power too) and they have been used on every newly designed gasoline engine. Hybrid is a different animal for a vehicle. It’s an overall design concept on vehicle powertrain to improve the efficiency. I don’t even consider it’s a gas-saving “feature” on a gasoline engine.

Leaking fuel tanks, brake malfunctions, failing transmissions, etc. on class-action lawsuits are quality issues, and not many vehicles are having these same issues consistently. Cylinder deactivation problems are industry wide and happens on almost every engine features CD from history. Since GM implemented the CD in 1980’s, there were so many problems that GM eventually had to drop the feature for many years. Unfortunately the theory of the cylinder deactivation simply is not logical for fuel saving with passive operation on deactivated cylinders. The uneven thermal effect and the vibration issues are too much to overcome even with today’s technology. Unless this variable displacement technology can be implemented with totally disconnected components on deactivated cylinders, this system simply is too complicated with not much gain on fuel efficiency. Worse, it also hurts the long-term reliability based on the history.
 
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2020 CX-5 AWD
I’ve owned three vehicles with cylinder deactivation ..... It isn’t a real concern regardless what we may think. ...
It sounds like you might be someone who trades newer vehicles fairly often, and therefore always has automaker warranties in effect. If so, then yes, there's nothing for you to be concerned about with CD, because the automakers are always going to deal with whatever $hit happens and make it right for you.

It's early in the game for CD in Mazda engines, and more time will need to pass before a definitive statement can be made about how well CD holds up as our engines tack on more years and miles. No one knows what the future holds, and perhaps Mazda CD will in fact turn out to not have significant systemic issues.

That said, I'm a big fan of basic and simple, and don't like anything that could potentially become additional points of failure. So if I had a magic eraser, it would be used to wipe away every trace of CD from my engine .
 
I am with you edmaz, I'm not a fan. I just don't see where CD is worthwhile. This is my 3rd CX5, 2014, 2016.5 and this 2020. I drive around 35k a year and typically the exact same route to work, 100 miles round trip. do the same sort of driving I have always done, mix of interstate and country roads and the 2020 does not get much better mileage than the 2016..not even noticeable to me, certainly not worth modifying an engine in a way that could reduce life expectancy. Of the 5 Mazdas I have owned this is the only one I have ever gotten an extended warranty on because I just don't fully trust the technology. I am getting up there in years and have owned just about every brand of car at some point and have learned my lesson on which t stay away from. Besides Mazda the only other vehicle I would purchase is Toyota but I am 6'4" and headroom is a known issue in the Rav and Tacoma so Mazda it was.

I have my fingers crossed but wondering what the engine is doing is never far from my mind. I wish Mazda would go back to their Zoom-Zoom days...at least have a trim level without all the nonsense and let those who like simple pleasures in driving have a great car. I know...dreaming.
 
Wow, how did you come up with that? So by your own definition turbocharging, direct injection, hybrid drives and variable valve timing aren’t “mature” technologies either. How about four-wheel-drive, is it not a “mature” technology?

You can google all day long if you want and see far more class-action lawsuits on much more common issues than on cylinder deactivation - leaking fuel tanks, brake malfunctions, failing transmissions, ad nauseum. I have better things to do.

Pretty sure this is the first straight 4 cylinder to have it. Really stupid considering the fuel savings.
 

sm1ke

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Back on topic. Thread was derailed right from the outset.

OP, your best bet would be to get in direct contact with one of the tuning companies (Versatuner, BMS, Orange Virus, etc.). They may have some insight on the CD in newer models. I believe Versatuner is currently doing some testing on current gen Mazdas - I'd start there.

As far as I'm aware, you'd have to mess with the software to disable CD, and I don't think anyone here has been able to do that.
 
:
Phoenix
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2020 CX5 signature
Don't know what the issue is, the Cadillac 4-6-8 L62 engine was a huge success - NOT. you youngen's can google this piece of engineering greatness
 
Thanks for the info. I think I will contact Versatuner to see what they say. Honestly though I think this is the end of the line for me and Mazda...the Zoom-Zoom days are over, the company is going a different direction. I think i'll sell it and buy a Tacoma. I need a new truck anyway. :)
 
Fortunately, in Canada the 2021 CX-5 GX and Kuro models only come equipped with the Skyactiv-G 2.5 NA without cylinder deactivation. They are Canadian base models, all other models have cylinder deactivation except those with turbos. I purchased my 2019 CX-5 GX new without cylinder deactivation and had to sacrifice a few options I would have liked in order to get the better engine (in my opinion).
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Fortunately, in Canada the 2021 CX-5 GX and Kuro models only come equipped with the Skyactiv-G 2.5 NA without cylinder deactivation. They are Canadian base models, all other models have cylinder deactivation except those with turbos. I purchased my 2019 CX-5 GX new without cylinder deactivation and had to sacrifice a few options I would have liked in order to get the better engine (in my opinion).
Since in Canada 2021 CX-5 Kuro includes more features “in addition to or in place of GS AWD with Comfort Package”, and “Cylinder Deactivation” is one of the “Key Features” on lower GS trim, I’d say CX-5 Kuro does have cylinder deactivation. Only the lowest trim CX-5 GX in Canada offers a 2.5L without cylinder deactivation, as usual.
 
Fortunately, in Canada the 2021 CX-5 GX and Kuro models only come equipped with the Skyactiv-G 2.5 NA without cylinder deactivation. They are Canadian base models, all other models have cylinder deactivation except those with turbos. I purchased my 2019 CX-5 GX new without cylinder deactivation and had to sacrifice a few options I would have liked in order to get the better engine (in my opinion).
I wonder if you got the “better” engine, or the same engine with cylinder deactivation with a software tweak to make it so the CD does not kick in?