My Thoughts on a 2017 CX-5 Touring

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2013 VRM Mazdaspeed3, 2016 Soul Red CX-5 GT
Had the opportunity last Monday to drive my mom's 2017 CX-5 to work. Drove it for the whole day including lunch break errands. So it was like an extended test drive, actually this is how test drives should be. Anyway, here are my thoughts on the differences between a 2016 CX-5 GT FWD (with Tech Package) and a 2017 CX-5 Touring FWD (Base model no packages). Obviously the 2016 GT will have more stuff in it, so I'll try to keep comparisons relevant to the daily driving experience.


  • The 2017 CX-5 is noticeably quieter than the 2016 CX-5 in city and highway driving. Even when your just idling you will notice it is quieter inside the car.

  • The 2017 CX-5 corners a lot more smoothly and pleasantly than the 2016 CX-5. I feel that there is less body roll in the 2017s and it is just pleasant to turn into a corner. Note that I am saying this for a Touring CX-5 with the 17 inch wheels. Bumps that are noticeable in the 2016 CX-5 GT, the 2017 Touring model just laughs it off. Maybe it is the 17 inch tires, or the improved suspension, but driving over train tracks is a revelation in the 2017 model. It just absorbs a lot of the bumps making the ride very smooth and comfy. While I didn't get to try out many quick lane changes, I don't feel like the 2017 CX-5 Touring is going to be behind the 2016 in terms of handling and cornering at all. I actually prefer the driving experience in the 2017 CX-5. My wife actually said it is more fun to drive than our 2016 CX-5.

  • The steering wheel on the 2017 CX-5 feels lighter, but not in a bad way. It just feels easier to turn the steering wheel, but I still feel like I have control over it and still get feedback from it. So I list this down as another improvement to the driving experience. The steering wheel design/shape on the 2017 is also an improvement in my opinion. Apart from the fact that the leather feels better and less slippery, the tapered shape of the steering wheel spokes (don't know what to call them) allows me to hold them more comfortably than in the 2016 CX-5.

  • The throttle mapping/sensitivity/response in the 2017 CX-5 is much more improved than in the 2016 model. I think this is the biggest improvement as far as daily driving is concerned. The pedal no longer feels heavy and so the car no longer feels heavy. I know the 2017 models are heavier, but because of the improved throttle response, the car feels lighter to me. It is possible that this 2017 CX-5 Touring is actually really lighter than our 2016 CX-5 GT with a tow hitch, but the improved throttle response is real. You step on it and it goes. You no longer have to wait for it to go, like in the 2016 CX-5 and that car isn't exactly a slouch when it comes to throttle response. The 2017 CX-5 is less reluctant to downshift which makes it more fun to drive. My wife also did a short drive with the 2017 CX-5 and the first thing she said when she came out of the car was, "this thing is fast!". She said that from a stop, she stepped on the gas pedal the same way she does on our 2016 CX-5 GT, and she ended up past 50 mph a lot quicker than in our 2016 CX-5. Now we all know, it is only as fast, not faster, maybe 0.1-0.2 seconds slower than the 2016, but that improved throttle response is an absolute improvement. I almost would like to say, that because of the improved throttle response on the 2017 CX-5, Sport Mode might no longer be needed. I was one of the people who criticized the 2017 model after reading the various test results, but after a day test driving it, I am 99% sure that you cannot tell the difference in performance in daily driving. In fact, you might come out saying the 2017 CX-5 is faster than the 2016 CX-5.

  • Another major improvement in the 2017 CX-5, which is still related to the throttle mapping/sensitivity is improved highway cruising. In the 2016 CX-5, the pedal generally feels heavy, like it was tuned for fuel economy unless you're in Sport Mode. Once you get past 65 mph in the 2016, it feels like the gas pedal gets heavier. Almost like it wants you to cruise at a max cruising speed of 65 mph. If you try to increase your cruising speed past 65 mph, like say you want to cruise at 70 or 75 mph, the gas pedal almost feels like it is reluctant to do so. I'm really happy to report that this is no longer an issue with the 2017 model. Pick the cruising speed you want and the gas pedal will accommodate, even if you want to cruise at 80 mph.

  • With the improved throttle response, I was worried it would affect fuel economy a lot. Actually this is probably why the 2017 models scored lower on the EPA ratings. Anyway, I was monitoring my commute with the fuel economy monitor and it looked like I was getting the same MPG as I was on our 2016 CX-5, maybe a tiny bit less MPG. But this 2017 CX-5 only had 325 miles on it, so still in pseudo break-in stage and lots of room to improve fuel economy in the future. I do feel that the improved throttle response will result in lower city driving MPG, just because the car is less reluctant to downshift and go zoom zoom.

  • Another minor change that turns out to be a major improvement for me and my wife, is the decreased effort in activating the turn signals. In the 2016 CX-5, activating the turn signals can be really tricky and sometimes you would end up past the center position and activating the other turn signal. In the 2017 this is a non-issue. Turning on your blinkers is effortless, just like it was in previous Mazdas and that's how it should be.

  • The 2017 CX-5 has a functional/working engine temp gauge. It is not one of those dumb on or off temp gauges, this one works like a gauge should. I can see if the engine is still cold and how far till I get to normal operating temp. Please keep doing it this way Mazda.

  • The driving info screen (right side of the dashboard) is, I would say, cluttered in the 2017 CX-5. I like that it shows more info, but maybe a little less info is better here. Also, the odometer is located on top of the fuel gauge bars. I initially thought this indicated the driving range of the car as it relates to remaining fuel, but when it kept on increasing as I was driving, I realized it was the odometer. To avoid confusion, I think this should be moved back to the center section of the dashboard.

  • The window controls on the 2017 CX-5 is now positioned on a downward slope, as opposed to the upward slope in previous Mazdas. I don't like it at all. Maybe it is a matter of getting used to, but I feel like it is harder to control the windows with the controls sloping downwards and away from the driver.

  • I like how the new AC vents look, but I think their new location is both good and bad. Good, if it is winter and your hands are freezing, because it will blow warm air directly at your hands on the steering wheel. Bad if you're trying to cool the car quickly during summer, because it will blow really cold air directly at your hands on the steering wheel.

  • The sound system on the base Touring model is acceptable, but if you like listening to music a lot, you should opt for the upgraded Bose system or an aftermarket sound system. Compared to the Bose system on my 2013 Speed, it doesn't sound that bad but it does sound muddy. With the base sound system on the 2017, I feel like you cannot separate the sound between bass and treble. Like all the sound is coming from just one place, or you're listening to decent stereo computer speakers without a subwoofer. Compared to the Bose system on the 2016, it is no-contest.

  • What else, the synthetic seats on the 2017 are acceptable and actually pretty comfy. I still really would prefer leather, because of the feel, but if that wasn't an option, the synthetic seats are okay. The suede type fabric in the center section of the seats makes it annoying to adjust position though, because it it grips your clothes really well. So it would make good seats for auto-crossing haha.

  • The windshield seems to be smaller in the 2017 CX-5 than the 2016. We have an OEM windshield sun shade/cover for our 2016 CX-5 and it doesn't fit at all on the 2017 CX-5. Not sure if that's a good or bad thing. I don't feel like my driving view has been decreased at all. Oh and I feel like the 2017 CX-5 has a long hood, which I'm not sure if it's true, but it sort of threw me off when I was trying to park it. I also feel like the C pillar or rear quarter window is higher in the 2017 CX-5, which made checking blind spots a tiny bit harder than in the 2016 CX-5. I suppose this is also a matter of getting used to as well.

  • My biggest complaint on the 2017 CX-5 is the softer brake pedal. I am very used to a responsive brake pedal that bites quickly and bites hard. In the 2017 CX-5, you have to step on the brake pedal a lot more to get the same effect. It does allow you to brake very smoothly though and towards the end of the day, I was already getting used to it, but I still prefer the more responsive brake pedal on the 2016 CX-5.

Final thoughts:
I think the driving experience in the 2017 CX-5 is a big improvement over the 2016 CX-5. The improved throttle response/sensitivity/mapping alone is enough to tempt me to trade in our 2016 CX-5. The extra improvements to the driving experience (better sound insulation, pleasant cornering/handling, comfier ride, etc...) just solidifies the fact that this is a better daily driving vehicle than the 2016 model. (Now I understand what Car and Driver meant when they reviewed the 2017 CX-5.) If we weren't trying to save money to buy a house, we would probably trade in our 2016 CX-5 GT for a 2017 CX-5 GT with the premium package (because I want the HUD and driver memory seats). If you're on the fence about getting a discounted 2016 model, definitely give the 2017 model a good long test drive. And if you're not constrained by your budget, I would say get the 2017 over the 2016 model. I think it's that good as far as daily driving is concerned. The 2016 still looks the best though, especially with those vampire fang wheels!

Question for 2017 CX-5 owners. Why is it that the 2017 CX-5 does a single beep every time I close a door? I didn't have time to go over the manual to figure this out.
 
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2018 AWD GT Premium Red/Black
Thanks for the review. Makes me more anxious to hear about the diesel, even though it sounds like your favorite improvement doesn't necessarily map to a different drivetrain.

Regarding the beep, perhaps its to confirm that the door is fully closed. There's another thread where a valet complains that the doors are difficult to close.
 
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2017 Mazda CX-5 GS AWD, 2017 Honda Pilot EX
As far as I know, that beep you hear is just the auto-lock feature. Close the door and you hear a beep to let you know it has been activated and then a second beep as you walk away, letting you know it has locked.
 
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2014 QX70 AWD
Nice write-up.

They pulled the A-pillars back a bit towards the rear to help with visibility. Probably explains why the windshield feels smaller coming from a 2016.
 

ColoradoDriver

Gen-1 Kodo Design
Contributor
:
Denver, CO
:
2014 CX-5 Touring
Nice write up! (thumb)

A couple of items to add.

The 2017 sits a little lower and has softened up the suspension a bit. So it is a smoother ride. I'm personally not of fan of this, but it seems to make sense for Mazda's attempt to move upmarket, obviously others will be a fan.

Regarding the seats, I sat in a Touring as well and did not care for the "Leatherette" at all (Mazda still needs to shoot whoever came up with that name). I wish Touring still had a cloth seat option. But then again, what do I care, I'm not buying a 2017. ;)

I've now seen several posts regarding the throttle mapping changes. Makes me think I need to take a 2017 out on the highway just to feel this difference.

Also appreciate the observations about the other details like window controls, turn signals (personally no issues using mine), steering wheel, etc.

Edit: Man...If I hadn't seen more and more 2017's here out on the road that reinforced my thinking that they are butt ugly, especially that front end and no swoop, I might be persuaded.
 
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2013 VRM Mazdaspeed3, 2016 Soul Red CX-5 GT
Thanks for the review. Makes me more anxious to hear about the diesel, even though it sounds like your favorite improvement doesn't necessarily map to a different drivetrain.

Regarding the beep, perhaps its to confirm that the door is fully closed. There's another thread where a valet complains that the doors are difficult to close.
I do not know how the diesel will drive and how its throttle mapping/response is going to be, especially since it has a lot more torque than the NA engine. It is almost a guarantee that it will require less downshifts in daily driving than with the NA engine. It should still come along with the same improvements to daily driving as the NA version. That said, all of these are just assumptions. I am really eager to test drive one.

As far as I know, that beep you hear is just the auto-lock feature. Close the door and you hear a beep to let you know it has been activated and then a second beep as you walk away, letting you know it has locked.
Makes sense. I believe the 2016 models already have auto-lock, but I have never turned on that feature so I don't know how it works.

Nice write-up.

They pulled the A-pillars back a bit towards the rear to help with visibility. Probably explains why the windshield feels smaller coming from a 2016.
That's probably why I feel the 2017 has a longer hood. At the very least, I didn't notice a decrease in visibility at the front, though I also didn't seem to notice an increase in visibility, oh well.

Nice write up! (thumb)

A couple of items to add.

The 2017 sits a little lower and has softened up the suspension a bit. So it is a smoother ride. I'm personally not of fan of this, but it seems to make sense for Mazda's attempt to move upmarket, obviously others will be a fan.

Regarding the seats, I sat in a Touring as well and did not care for the "Leatherette" at all (Mazda still needs to shoot whoever came up with that name). I wish Touring still had a cloth seat option. But then again, what do I care, I'm not buying a 2017. ;)

I've now seen several posts regarding the throttle mapping changes. Makes me think I need to take a 2017 out on the highway just to feel this difference.

Also appreciate the observations about the other details like window controls, turn signals (personally no issues using mine), steering wheel, etc.

Edit: Man...If I hadn't seen more and more 2017's here out on the road that reinforced my thinking that they are butt ugly, especially that front end and no swoop, I might be persuaded.
Correct, the 2017 models sit a little lower than the 2016 models. There were also some tweaks done to the suspension for better NVH. Actually having both cars side by side, you can easily see that the 2017 roof is lower and that it sits lower. It also seems a little longer too.

I think BMW came up with the word "Leatherette" and Mazda just rolled with it. After looking at the names they came up with for other stuff, like iActiv, iEloop, I think "Leatherette" is a safer choice than say something like "iLeather" LOL.
 
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Fmr CX5 Touring
That's close to how I felt when I test drove it. I'm not sure I agree on the throttle response. I had to punch it once and it didn't offer much in a minor time of need. Also, I thought it was heavier to turn, but in a really minute way.

I'd love to see a car dealer turn their loaner fleet loose on the weekends for test drives. I'd happily pay a rental fee for an all-day test drive of a car I was serious about. It doesn't have to be the exact same model, just close enough to get a feel for it in what I do on a daily basis.

But it'll never happen. The test drive is a major part of the selling process for car dealers and screwing you. Sometimes I marvel that we allow a structure that runs itself the way most of them do to exist. Sure, capitalism, but this is the worst kind of it, and it's just chicken s*** on so many levels.
 

Sailingeric

Member
:
2016.5 Cx-5 Touring, 2007 Mazda 3 GT
Edit: Man...If I hadn't seen more and more 2017's here out on the road that reinforced my thinking that they are butt ugly, especially that front end and no swoop, I might be persuaded.

I am glad I am not the only one. That is why I got a 2016.5 Touring with Bose and moonroof over a 2017, that front end is just fugly.

I have not driven an a 2016 or newer or a 2017 but I think my 2016.5 is really quiet on the often noisy roads here in the PNW.
 
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GJ-Molestor

Banned
:
2011 BMW 528i, 2015 Mazda 6, 1995 Nissan Maxima Manual
Had the opportunity last Monday to drive my mom's 2017 CX-5 to work. Drove it for the whole day including lunch break errands. So it was like an extended test drive, actually this is how test drives should be. Anyway, here are my thoughts on the differences between a 2016 CX-5 GT FWD (with Tech Package) and a 2017 CX-5 Touring FWD (Base model no packages). Obviously the 2016 GT will have more stuff in it, so I'll try to keep comparisons relevant to the daily driving experience.


  • The 2017 CX-5 is noticeably quieter than the 2016 CX-5 in city and highway driving. Even when your just idling you will notice it is quieter inside the car.

  • The 2017 CX-5 corners a lot more smoothly and pleasantly than the 2016 CX-5. I feel that there is less body roll in the 2017s and it is just pleasant to turn into a corner. Note that I am saying this for a Touring CX-5 with the 17 inch wheels. Bumps that are noticeable in the 2016 CX-5 GT, the 2017 Touring model just laughs it off. Maybe it is the 17 inch tires, or the improved suspension, but driving over train tracks is a revelation in the 2017 model. It just absorbs a lot of the bumps making the ride very smooth and comfy. While I didn't get to try out many quick lane changes, I don't feel like the 2017 CX-5 Touring is going to be behind the 2016 in terms of handling and cornering at all. I actually prefer the driving experience in the 2017 CX-5. My wife actually said it is more fun to drive than our 2016 CX-5.

  • The steering wheel on the 2017 CX-5 feels lighter, but not in a bad way. It just feels easier to turn the steering wheel, but I still feel like I have control over it and still get feedback from it. So I list this down as another improvement to the driving experience. The steering wheel design/shape on the 2017 is also an improvement in my opinion. Apart from the fact that the leather feels better and less slippery, the tapered shape of the steering wheel spokes (don't know what to call them) allows me to hold them more comfortably than in the 2016 CX-5.

  • The throttle mapping/sensitivity/response in the 2017 CX-5 is much more improved than in the 2016 model. I think this is the biggest improvement as far as daily driving is concerned. The pedal no longer feels heavy and so the car no longer feels heavy. I know the 2017 models are heavier, but because of the improved throttle response, the car feels lighter to me. It is possible that this 2017 CX-5 Touring is actually really lighter than our 2016 CX-5 GT with a tow hitch, but the improved throttle response is real. You step on it and it goes. You no longer have to wait for it to go, like in the 2016 CX-5 and that car isn't exactly a slouch when it comes to throttle response. The 2017 CX-5 is less reluctant to downshift which makes it more fun to drive. My wife also did a short drive with the 2017 CX-5 and the first thing she said when she came out of the car was, "this thing is fast!". She said that from a stop, she stepped on the gas pedal the same way she does on our 2016 CX-5 GT, and she ended up past 50 mph a lot quicker than in our 2016 CX-5. Now we all know, it is only as fast, not faster, maybe 0.1-0.2 seconds slower than the 2016, but that improved throttle response is an absolute improvement. I almost would like to say, that because of the improved throttle response on the 2017 CX-5, Sport Mode might no longer be needed. I was one of the people who criticized the 2017 model after reading the various test results, but after a day test driving it, I am 99% sure that you cannot tell the difference in performance in daily driving. In fact, you might come out saying the 2017 CX-5 is faster than the 2016 CX-5.

  • Another major improvement in the 2017 CX-5, which is still related to the throttle mapping/sensitivity is improved highway cruising. In the 2016 CX-5, the pedal generally feels heavy, like it was tuned for fuel economy unless you're in Sport Mode. Once you get past 65 mph in the 2016, it feels like the gas pedal gets heavier. Almost like it wants you to cruise at a max cruising speed of 65 mph. If you try to increase your cruising speed past 65 mph, like say you want to cruise at 70 or 75 mph, the gas pedal almost feels like it is reluctant to do so. I'm really happy to report that this is no longer an issue with the 2017 model. Pick the cruising speed you want and the gas pedal will accommodate, even if you want to cruise at 80 mph.

  • With the improved throttle response, I was worried it would affect fuel economy a lot. Actually this is probably why the 2017 models scored lower on the EPA ratings. Anyway, I was monitoring my commute with the fuel economy monitor and it looked like I was getting the same MPG as I was on our 2016 CX-5, maybe a tiny bit less MPG. But this 2017 CX-5 only had 325 miles on it, so still in pseudo break-in stage and lots of room to improve fuel economy in the future. I do feel that the improved throttle response will result in lower city driving MPG, just because the car is less reluctant to downshift and go zoom zoom.

  • Another minor change that turns out to be a major improvement for me and my wife, is the decreased effort in activating the turn signals. In the 2016 CX-5, activating the turn signals can be really tricky and sometimes you would end up past the center position and activating the other turn signal. In the 2017 this is a non-issue. Turning on your blinkers is effortless, just like it was in previous Mazdas and that's how it should be.

  • The 2017 CX-5 has a functional/working engine temp gauge. It is not one of those dumb on or off temp gauges, this one works like a gauge should. I can see if the engine is still cold and how far till I get to normal operating temp. Please keep doing it this way Mazda.

  • The driving info screen (right side of the dashboard) is, I would say, cluttered in the 2017 CX-5. I like that it shows more info, but maybe a little less info is better here. Also, the odometer is located on top of the fuel gauge bars. I initially thought this indicated the driving range of the car as it relates to remaining fuel, but when it kept on increasing as I was driving, I realized it was the odometer. To avoid confusion, I think this should be moved back to the center section of the dashboard.

  • The window controls on the 2017 CX-5 is now positioned on a downward slope, as opposed to the upward slope in previous Mazdas. I don't like it at all. Maybe it is a matter of getting used to, but I feel like it is harder to control the windows with the controls sloping downwards and away from the driver.

  • I like how the new AC vents look, but I think their new location is both good and bad. Good, if it is winter and your hands are freezing, because it will blow warm air directly at your hands on the steering wheel. Bad if you're trying to cool the car quickly during summer, because it will blow really cold air directly at your hands on the steering wheel.

  • The sound system on the base Touring model is acceptable, but if you like listening to music a lot, you should opt for the upgraded Bose system or an aftermarket sound system. Compared to the Bose system on my 2013 Speed, it doesn't sound that bad but it does sound muddy. With the base sound system on the 2017, I feel like you cannot separate the sound between bass and treble. Like all the sound is coming from just one place, or you're listening to decent stereo computer speakers without a subwoofer. Compared to the Bose system on the 2016, it is no-contest.

  • What else, the synthetic seats on the 2017 are acceptable and actually pretty comfy. I still really would prefer leather, because of the feel, but if that wasn't an option, the synthetic seats are okay. The suede type fabric in the center section of the seats makes it annoying to adjust position though, because it it grips your clothes really well. So it would make good seats for auto-crossing haha.

  • The windshield seems to be smaller in the 2017 CX-5 than the 2016. We have an OEM windshield sun shade/cover for our 2016 CX-5 and it doesn't fit at all on the 2017 CX-5. Not sure if that's a good or bad thing. I don't feel like my driving view has been decreased at all. Oh and I feel like the 2017 CX-5 has a long hood, which I'm not sure if it's true, but it sort of threw me off when I was trying to park it. I also feel like the C pillar or rear quarter window is higher in the 2017 CX-5, which made checking blind spots a tiny bit harder than in the 2016 CX-5. I suppose this is also a matter of getting used to as well.

  • My biggest complaint on the 2017 CX-5 is the softer brake pedal. I am very used to a responsive brake pedal that bites quickly and bites hard. In the 2017 CX-5, you have to step on the brake pedal a lot more to get the same effect. It does allow you to brake very smoothly though and towards the end of the day, I was already getting used to it, but I still prefer the more responsive brake pedal on the 2016 CX-5.

Final thoughts:
I think the driving experience in the 2017 CX-5 is a big improvement over the 2016 CX-5. The improved throttle response/sensitivity/mapping alone is enough to tempt me to trade in our 2016 CX-5. The extra improvements to the driving experience (better sound insulation, pleasant cornering/handling, comfier ride, etc...) just solidifies the fact that this is a better daily driving vehicle than the 2016 model. (Now I understand what Car and Driver meant when they reviewed the 2017 CX-5.) If we weren't trying to save money to buy a house, we would probably trade in our 2016 CX-5 GT for a 2017 CX-5 GT with the premium package (because I want the HUD and driver memory seats). If you're on the fence about getting a discounted 2016 model, definitely give the 2017 model a good long test drive. And if you're not constrained by your budget, I would say get the 2017 over the 2016 model. I think it's that good as far as daily driving is concerned. The 2016 still looks the best though, especially with those vampire fang wheels!

Question for 2017 CX-5 owners. Why is it that the 2017 CX-5 does a single beep every time I close a door? I didn't have time to go over the manual to figure this out.

very good review, thanks.

some things I wanted to point out:

- the smaller rims are definitely more comfortable a better suited for daily driving on these cars. this is probably why you had a better time cornering the car VS your 2016 model.

- the steering in the 2017 model felt lighter because it does not have the big 19" rims

- do you think that your 2016 model felt reluctant to go faster because sixth gear is simply too long? it keeps the RPM's too low for accelerating and requires you to downshift into fifth or 6th gear to pass on the highway. I feel like when I am going 70-100MPH, with the rpm's at 3000RPM in sixth gear, there is plenty of passing power without needing to downshift and the car moves along quite well. I am talking about the lower and lighter Mazda 6 though, which is probably why it feels better at higher speed.

so you were saying that the newer model picks up speed easier? is a difference with transmission gearing/response or more to do with the change in throttle response?

- all in all the changes sound good, but I am truly very dissapointed with the softer brake pedal. why consumers want reduced braking precision/effort is beyond me. I don't understand how a softer brake pedal makes the car more luxurious. those people must have never driven a true luxury car with very firm and sensitive brakes.

- was the seat in the 2017 model more comfortable? how about the materials throughout the cabin? better quality?
 
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'18 Mazda CX-5 Akera KG i-Activ AWD 2.5L In Sonic Silver
very good review, thanks.

some things I wanted to point out:

- do you think that your 2016 model felt reluctant to go faster because sixth gear is simply too long? it keeps the RPM's too low for accelerating and requires you to downshift into fifth or 6th gear to pass on the highway. I feel like when I am going 70-100MPH, with the rpm's at 3000RPM in sixth gear, there is plenty of passing power without needing to downshift and the car moves along quite well. I am talking about the lower and lighter Mazda 6 though, which is probably why it feels better at higher speed.

This is the first model that they have tuned throttle, shift points etc to be more driver-centric than fuel efficiency. Hence more on demand performance rather than any hesitation/reluctance.
 
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2021 CX-9 Sig
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2014 CX-5 GT
Agree with almost everything you wrote. My dealer lets me test drive one every time I am there. You have to drive it to really understand it is better. I have said it before and I will say it again, it makes my 2014 feel and look like crap.
 

GJ-Molestor

Banned
:
2011 BMW 528i, 2015 Mazda 6, 1995 Nissan Maxima Manual
Agree with almost everything you wrote. My dealer lets me test drive one every time I am there. You have to drive it to really understand it is better. I have said it before and I will say it again, it makes my 2014 feel and look like crap.

Until you press the luxury brake in the 2017 model and realize you miss your 2014... plus theyve softened the suspension on their cars for what, that fourth time already?

But I digress. Mazda has come a long way these few last years.