Mazda developing staight-six engines

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2010 CX-9 GT
We'd be talking about the next generation arcitecture, so a RWD switch would be reasonable. Just speculation at this point but it just seems to make sense with them going to a straight 6. While they have been used with FWD arcitecture, it's just not typical.
That presentation, on other pages, talks about Mazda's strategy for the next 100 years. While that is a rather long time horizon, their immediate goal for the next 15 years is to greatly increase the average selling price of their cars. In that light, a switch to a more "premium" drivetrain layout (front engine, inline 6, RWD) makes complete sense.

I hope they pull it off. Mazda has always made nice driving cars. A RWD Mazda sure sounds nice...
 
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13' CX-5 and 16' Mazda6 both Touring w/Tech/Bose
I*m not sure converting their current architecture to RWD makes sense. Too costly. Also, they have made no mention of this.
Implementing a straight 6 into FWD format? They will realize minimized returns in terms of luxury status rep they're trying hard to attain. The industry never received FWD v6 honda/acuras as true entry luxury contenders. The press would eat up an inline-6 FWD mazda alive.
 
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2017 Crystal Mica Blue GT CX9
I believe Mazda is in the works of switching to RWD platforms, at least with the Mazda 6 and CX-9. This to me is the obvious conclusion with the development of an inline 6 from a small automaker. This makes perfect sense for Mazda who prioritizes driving dynamics. Why continue with FWD architecture? Especially when most people in the northern hemisphere are opting for AWD. FWD just isn't the necessary thing it used to be.

Ford even made this move with the best seller Explorer. Dynamics will be better and the proportions are fantastic with the short front overhang. Imagine how fantastic the next 6/CX-9 would be on a RWD platform powered by a straight 6! Or what might be a pipe dream: A turbo version of that inline 6 in either vehicle. Holy crap!

A twin Turbo I-6 "Mazda Speed 9" to compete with the Acura MDX SH-AWD with the torque vectoring would be a thing of dreams!

At the very least, they have the space for it with the current CX-9 hood. My guess is it is a N/A iteration of the HCCI, with cost reductions from the removal of the c-EGR, turbos and inter-cooler and probably targeting better reliability and multi emissions capability. The other thought is they may be gearing for the return of a small pickup in the US eg. replacement of the BT-50
 
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2019 CX-9 Signature
Came from the BMW I6. The B58 was one hell of an engine for a DD. I miss that engine and the thick Nappa wrapped M Sport steering.
Definitely great news for us that Mazda is going to have their own I6.
 
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cx9
I wonder about mpg. You already know the hp and tq will be good based on the n/a fours. Figure 220 to 290 depending on how they stroke/bore them.

Guessing it will do really good mpg numbers with those funky partial fill combustion chambers and being even less loaded because sharing work among more cylinders. Looking forward to 2022, will be interesting to see.
 

SDL

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2016 Mazda CX-9 GT
I believe Mazda is in the works of switching to RWD platforms, at least with the Mazda 6 and CX-9. This to me is the obvious conclusion with the development of an inline 6 from a small automaker. This makes perfect sense for Mazda who prioritizes driving dynamics. Why continue with FWD architecture? Especially when most people in the northern hemisphere are opting for AWD. FWD just isn't the necessary thing it used to be.

Ford even made this move with the best seller Explorer. Dynamics will be better and the proportions are fantastic with the short front overhang. Imagine how fantastic the next 6/CX-9 would be on a RWD platform powered by a straight 6! Or what might be a pipe dream: A turbo version of that inline 6 in either vehicle. Holy crap!
Have you ever driven in inclement weather with a RWD vehicle?

AWD > FWD > RWD ... actually if it's snowing, you're better off not driving an RWD.
 

JPL

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2018 Mazda6, CX-9
Have you ever driven in inclement weather with a RWD vehicle?

AWD > FWD > RWD ... actually if it's snowing, you're better off not driving an RWD.
I did own one for a while here in New England. I even ran it without proper tires and it was a disaster. However, with winter tires, you'd be fine. I understand most people don't like to switch to winter sets though.

What I'm saying is that people will be getting the AWD version in the north anyway. I will concede that there's going to be the buyer that just wants a more basic FWD car for as less money as possible that will get the job done in the winter.
 
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Mazda CX-9 Grand Touring 2016
When I ski in Austria I see a lot of RWD Mercedes & BMWs. Of course, they all have four winter tires.
 
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CX9
I posted on this topic elsewhere on this forum. Based on my experience driving fully tracked armored vehicles in severe weather conditions it's my opinion that 4WD/AWD systems in today's cars are highly overrated. Most people regardless of geography don't need it; safer driving tactics and perhaps winter rated tires are probably a better and less costly strategy. But if you've convinced yourself that you 'need' AWD you likely won't be satisfied without it.
 

Chris_Top_Her

Banned
Moderator
Contributor
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San Antonio, Texas
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'15 CX-5 Miata AWD
Fwd supremacy is a result of fuel economy and production cost saving starting the 70s. Outside of that fwd has few if any performance merit over rwd/awd. I want awd for the superior driving dynamic over fwd.
 
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CX-9
Most people regardless of geography don't need it; safer driving tactics and perhaps winter rated tires are probably a better and less costly strategy. But if you've convinced yourself that you 'need' AWD you likely won't be satisfied without it.

Based on 50 years of driving in various parts of Canada, with RWD, FWD, and AWD vehicles I would say you are flat wrong. I have always put on full winter tires in every vehicle I have ever owned, so I am well aware of the difference between winter and summer (or all-season) tires. Without question, four wheel drive -- no matter whether full-time or on-demand -- is significantly better than two-wheel drive in snow, packed snow, ice, and freezing rain conditions. And contrary to myth, four-wheel drive does help you steer.

I currently live at the bottom of a steep, twisty hill. My wife drives a RWD BMW with every electronic gizmo to help keep going in slippery conditions. She runs Michelin Ice winter tires. After a snowfall there is no way she can get out of our driveway and up the hill, no matter how many bags of sand I heave onto the trunk. But my AWD CX9 -- shod with Nokian Hakkas -- quietly and without fuss drives up the hill and away.
 
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Mazda CX-9 Grand Touring 2016
Say it takes 40 hp to actually climb that hill. With 2wd you need to transfer 20 hp worth of grip from each drive tire to the road (assuming no differential difference, for simplicity's sake). With 4wd you only need to transfer 10 hp worth of grip from each tire. That means less chance of a tire slipping, and if one slips there are 3 others to carry on.

Most of us don't need to drive up steep twisty hill roads often in a winter. I've done a lot of winter mountain travel in FWD cars wearing 4 winter tires. The most likely time to get stuck was in the spring when parking lots turned to bottomless slush or in an uneven ski area parking lot where the attendant tried to wave me into a down-sloping parking spot. Otherwise things went fine. As I noted above, on ski trips in Europe I see lots of RWD cars with 4 winter tires on the highways and town roads & parking lots. I did used to live at the top of a steep twisty hill road in Jackson Hole. With my BMW and the winter tires of the day I could have made the hill if it had been straight so I could carry some speed, or around the curve if had been less steep. As it was, it took chains. Of course, downhill was more risky.
 
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cx9
Fwd supremacy is a result of fuel economy and production cost saving starting the 70s. Outside of that fwd has few if any performance merit over rwd/awd. I want awd for the superior driving dynamic over fwd.
I don't know how this 6 cylinder thread got turned into a fwd vs awd thread.. but WEEE! I'll join the fray. FWD took over the market because packaging wise its easiest way. One lump up front means more space for passenger room, crash absorption, whatever you want to use the more space for. Also, you can design superbly handling fwds, but people don't give a crap. 9 out of 10 people don't care one bit about driving dynamics. So they don't build them to handle that way. Also, 9 out of 10 people don't live at the top of a twisty steep snowy mountain road.

People like roadrutz don't need to ask if they should get the AWD model, they know. If you're asking if you need it, chances are you don't need it. Which is why I recommend FWD to those people. People who need it already know they need it so they're not the ones up here asking. So roadrutz is correct and also imo 11E20 is correct that they are over rated. They will help on aforementioned snowy steep roads, but the way they are made, they are not as good as they could be.
 
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cx9
Imagine a mazda6 with a 3.8 liter straight six turbo lump... with 375hp and 450 foot pounds.. that much power and torque you would have your case for your awd right there. Hopefully in house specc'd and designed to the vehicle in this case. And throw in the fancy boy wood interior bits and leather, where would you price such a beast.. 60k?
 

helbigtw

T-Rav
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PA
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08 CX-9 GT FWD
I think Mazda is losing a lot of CX-9 buyers with a 4 turbo only with no upgrade possible. Looking forward to seeing what they do in the next decade.
 
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cx9
I think its really dumb to write off a 300 ft lb engine "because four cylinder" but yes you could very well be correct.. consumers can be dumb.

Like I said before there are kiddos out there making 500hp on 1.6 liter motors. They been doing it for decades.
 
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