Cylinder Deactivation Update

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2018 CX-5 Sport
When I bought mine in late 2018 I knew it had CD, but I was assured by a couple of mechanics about Mazda's brilliant engineers and not worry about it. Then of course the rockers falling off issue materialized. I rather it not have CD, the fewer complexities to go wrong the better.
 
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2019 Cx-5 sport
Just to chime in , I didn't know about cd with this cx5 when I bought it and
no one at the dealership said anything about it. None of the reviews I read
mentioned it either, and it wasn't printed on the invoice.
Found out about it on this site first time.... wouldn't have bought
this vehicle if I'd known.... , still, cx5 is doing ok right now..
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
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Plano, Texas, USA
Just to chime in , I didn't know about cd with this cx5 when I bought it and
no one at the dealership said anything about it. None of the reviews I read
mentioned it either, and it wasn't printed on the invoice.
Found out about it on this site first time.... wouldn't have bought
this vehicle if I'd known.... , still, cx5 is doing ok right now..
You’re not alone. The salesmen at my Mazda dealer knew nothing about the new cylinder deactivation “feature” in 2018 when I was checking out the CX-5. See, if CD is such a great thing, how come Mazda North Amerucan Operations don’t educate the salesmen at Mazda dealerships and make them using the CD as a great selling point? Instead Mazda seems to be afraid of mentioning the CD may be because it has bad reputation from history?
 
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2019 CX-5 Signature
Just to chime in , I didn't know about cd with this cx5 when I bought it and
no one at the dealership said anything about it. None of the reviews I read
mentioned it either, and it wasn't printed on the invoice.
Found out about it on this site first time.... wouldn't have bought
this vehicle if I'd known.... , still, cx5 is doing ok right now..

If it was a concern, you would have known of it before buying. It's nothing like the gas in oil issue the CR-V's experienced. That was headline news. Don't let a few people on the forum make you question your decision. Just enjoy it...
 
also if memory serves me right, the issue with cd software was related to mitsubishi ecu software from the factory. Most cx5 I have checked, mine as well, are Denso Ecu. they did update the software anyway with the latest at that time. v.J
And newest cx5s come with even newer ones.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
also if memory serves me right, the issue with cd software was related to mitsubishi ecu software from the factory. Most cx5 I have checked, mine as well, are Denso Ecu. they did update the software anyway with the latest at that time. v.J
And newest cx5s come with even newer ones.
This story of wrong version software used with different vender, the Mitsubishi PCM instead of Denso, was mentioned by Go Hawks which was given by Mazda North American Opetations. But if you read the official chronologies submitted to NHTSA by MNAO about cylinder deactivation recall in post #93 by zroger73, no such thing is mentioned. MNAO received the first field report of rocket arm fallen off on 1/31/2018, and determined an inappropriate specification of oil pressure control signal response as the root cause on 11/2/2018. Then Mazda found another root cause which is the software programming bugs during transitions between cylinder deactivation modes on 1/24/2019, and initiated a PCM software design change on 3/29/2019.

I enjoy reading the chronologies associated with recalls. This information can be found under "Associated Documents" for a recall on the NHTSA website.

Here's the chronology for one of the recalls on the 2018-2019 CX-5:

View attachment 227863
 

HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
If it was a concern, you would have known of it before buying. It's nothing like the gas in oil issue the CR-V's experienced. That was headline news. Don't let a few people on the forum make you question your decision. Just enjoy it...
That's a good way to look at it.

I have the same view toward the direct injection carbon build-up issue which may never materialize into something that needs attention. I've had mpg drops after a fuel injector cleanings on two different low mileage vehicles and never had it done since with vehicles humming along up to 150,000 miles. The lesson is if it ain't broke don't fix it, don't worry, be happy if you were happy with the purchase in the first place.

My thinking is take a benchmark on your mpgs in your typical driving, in my case 32-33 in long haul highway driving at 72 mph, give or take, and 28-29 in mixed rural/suburban/highway with some short hops mixed in. If the engine fells good, sounds good, and the mileage stays relatively steady, then just enjoy the ride and don't f*ck with mother nature, so to speak. Just don't skimp on oil changes.

There's not much point in obsessing about what might or might not happen. And as you indicate, it's not like the competition doesn't have their own isolated issues. Consumer Reports continues to give used first generation CX-5s through and into the 2018+ high reliability marks based on subscriber trouble reports which illustrates how a cluster of complaints is not reflective of the overall odds.

There is one concession I'm making with this direct injection engine: I'll be steering clear (pun intended) of no name gasoline off the Indian reservation even though my other vehicles have run great on it. Sunoco is Top Tier and it's nearby. [Edit: I see now that Sunoco is no longer listed on the Top Tier web site. Evidently they suspended their participation in May 2020 due to C.] That ought to do it. Too bad, though. The reservation undercuts everybody by 20-30 cents because they don't charge the state fuel tax even though the tax break is supposed to go only to the tribe members. So I guess I'll be complicit in violating the law only half the time. Or is it a law if it is not enforced, like a speed limit signs? ;)
 
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