CX-5 Oil Filter - using longer one instead of OEM spec

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CX5 GT-R
I used to be all about using a "bigger filter", and on American cars from the 80's and 90's, which is where my car ownership started, I doubt there were any downsides, really. However, on these newer vehicles, I would rather stay 100% OEM, due to bypass settings, resistance over filter media, etc. and honestly, if you have that much crap in your oil that you need more filter to get it all out...your engine won't last long, anyway. Further, if your oil cooler is so ineffective that you are using the larger filter so you can get a bit more driving in before oil temps crest, 1) You won't get much, and 2) Fix your junk.
 
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CX5 GT-R
Actually the Wix filter is specifically designed for skyactiv engines only. It's not a universal engine to be used with other cars. Wix took Mazda's oem filter and created their version to meet the skyactiv engine's specs. The(correct oem size) does not have the anti-drainback valve. They claim to at the very least meet the skyactiv engine's specific specs outlined by the oem filter. Kudos to them for going out of their way in creating a filter specifically for skyactiv engines. All that said I'm sticking with OEM since its..well..cheaper. To the Wix filter's credit the rubber gasket thingy looks a lot thicker than the OEM filter.

WIX makes good filters. If you own a vehicle with real gauges, you will see less pressure drop with them, in my experience. Also, the lifter noise in my LS1 was a little quieter with WIX. Further, at the oil pressures my cousin's dirt-track cars ran at, he was blowing FRAMS guts out, literally. WIX held up with never an issue.
 
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Mazda
Skyactiv Oil Filters

Here is one MNAO PDF to their US Mazda Dealers concerning genuine Oil Filter(s) installation and use for ALL SA Engines..
Mazda Dealers (in USA particularly) are also seeing stored DTC's (Diagnostic Trouble Codes in PCM) when they use even 'other' genuine Mazda oil filters in Skyactiv engines, see pic, they look identical, but it is what is inside.
 

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13' CX-5 and 16' Mazda6 both Touring w/Tech/Bose
Yeah I think I'm sticking with OEM Mazda filters. Here's the back story why I resurrected this thread.

I wanted to do one test cycle of Mobil 1 0w-20 extended performance. I was to perform an oil analysis at 7k miles. If analysis comes back suggesting the oil has much life left I was going to extend it to 10k miles and perform another oil analysis again and post my findings. The problem lies in finding a matching long life filter however a solution would be using Mobil 1's matching long life filter.. Keep in mind Mobil guarantee's 15k miles in which the max I would go is 10k miles.

What sucks is that Mazda requires a very specific spec for the oil filter and I think Mobil 1's filters are cookie cutters to fit multiple car makes/models. Wix (a trusted company) has the physically longer filter which I was thinking of using for longevity as it fits but it simply does not meet specs let alone include the ADBV. So my above plan is axed:(
 
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Mazda
The genuine Japan made Oil Filters for Mazda's Skyactiv engines are the same units used worldwide (OEM Part Numbers).

They have a greater usable life than just 10K (Miles) in fact service intervals in Europe are 20K (KM) or 12K miles before any OF change.
 
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2013 Mazda CX-5, 2.0 Manual Transmission, 1989 Mazda MX-6
oem filter for me. I started out using aftermarket filters on my 90 626. But with ticking noises on cold start up I switched to mazda filters. It helped this tremendously. And now the filters do not cost much more than filters at a parts store. And depending on the filter even less money. Whenever I am at the dealer I just purchase a few filters at once. I had 360,000 miles on the original engine on the 626, which is still going strong. I drove it across the US last year and did not even have to add oil.
 

Chris_Top_Her

Banned
Moderator
Contributor
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San Antonio, Texas
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'15 CX-5 Miata AWD
oem filter for me. I started out using aftermarket filters on my 90 626. But with ticking noises on cold start up I switched to mazda filters. It helped this tremendously. And now the filters do not cost much more than filters at a parts store. And depending on the filter even less money. Whenever I am at the dealer I just purchase a few filters at once. I had 360,000 miles on the original engine on the 626, which is still going strong. I drove it across the US last year and did not even have to add oil.

Is that the turbo hatchback by chance?
 
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13' CX-5 and 16' Mazda6 both Touring w/Tech/Bose
The genuine Japan made Oil Filters for Mazda's Skyactiv engines are the same units used worldwide (OEM Part Numbers).

They have a greater usable life than just 10K (Miles) in fact service intervals in Europe are 20K (KM) or 12K miles before any OF change.


hmmmmmm?!?!?!?!?

 
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2016 CX-5 Sport AWD
So have there been any actual cases where the oil filter caused a SkyActive motor to fail? All I keep reading is that the OEM filters are the best, they do not have ADBV, aftermarket filters do which can restrict SOME oil flow, and you couldn't potentially have a stored code or CEL because of the filter(which again, I haven't see factual proof). The reason I am bringing this up is because there are a lot of SkyActive engines out there, and I doubt that everyone takes the time to read up on the proper oil filter, but you don't see it being an issue. I currently have a Purolator and am considering switching over to OEM, but we just got done with a blizzard here so don't feel like changing the filter in the snow.
 

MikeM.

MoMo
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2013 Mazda CX-5 Touring AWD 2.0L
It's probably not a big deal. Key word is "probably".

With the low cost and high quality of the OEM filter I can't think of a single reason to use a different brand. I just order them on-line with my Molybdenum 0W-20 oil.
 
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2016 CX-5 Sport AWD
I used a Purolator because I needed to change the oil and didn't really prepare in advance. I'll be switching to a Mazda one as I usually tend to stick to OEM with all of my new vehicles.
 
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13' CX-5 and 16' Mazda6 both Touring w/Tech/Bose
So have there been any actual cases where the oil filter caused a SkyActive motor to fail? All I keep reading is that the OEM filters are the best, they do not have ADBV, aftermarket filters do which can restrict SOME oil flow, and you couldn't potentially have a stored code or CEL because of the filter(which again, I haven't see factual proof). The reason I am bringing this up is because there are a lot of SkyActive engines out there, and I doubt that everyone takes the time to read up on the proper oil filter, but you don't see it being an issue. I currently have a Purolator and am considering switching over to OEM, but we just got done with a blizzard here so don't feel like changing the filter in the snow.

I'd switch over to OEM over the purolator. That said as someone already posted, RockAuto sells the OEM equivalent spec WIX 57002 filter for about half the price but you have to pay for shipping. They charge roughly $30 for 4 filters for me 2-3 day shipping via FedEx.
 
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2015 CX-5 GT
I worked for Advance Auto for a bit. I had to take courses to learn the products and found out that the Purolator PureOne filtered 99.9%, more than the Mobil 1 filter. Since then, I've always used PureOne filters. Ironically, Advance Auto Parts would show the PL14612 for a 2014 Mazda6, but not for a 2014 CX-5. I called them and used logic with the person I was talking to. He agreed with me, but nothing has changed. The cool thing is if you buy enough filters to go over $50, or a combination of things, you can usually find a Promo code for $20 off a $50 order, bring the price down to a decent level. So, I have a bunch of PureOne filters and, thanks to Costco offering $10 off a six-pack of Mobil 1 0W-20 every now and then, which brings it down to around $26 (better per quart than Walmart's 5-quart jug), I'm set.

I'll take my chances with the PureOne.
 
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2016 CX-5 Sport AWD
I went ahead and changed my filter to the OEM one. The only visual difference I noticed between the two are the gasket, length, and internally they looked the same (I didn't take them apart).
 
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13' CX-5 and 16' Mazda6 both Touring w/Tech/Bose
I worked for Advance Auto for a bit. I had to take courses to learn the products and found out that the Purolator PureOne filtered 99.9%, more than the Mobil 1 filter. Since then, I've always used PureOne filters. Ironically, Advance Auto Parts would show the PL14612 for a 2014 Mazda6, but not for a 2014 CX-5. I called them and used logic with the person I was talking to. He agreed with me, but nothing has changed. The cool thing is if you buy enough filters to go over $50, or a combination of things, you can usually find a Promo code for $20 off a $50 order, bring the price down to a decent level. So, I have a bunch of PureOne filters and, thanks to Costco offering $10 off a six-pack of Mobil 1 0W-20 every now and then, which brings it down to around $26 (better per quart than Walmart's 5-quart jug), I'm set.

I'll take my chances with the PureOne.

These days the filtration for most oil filters are good across the board including the Purolator filter. One physical benefit of the OEM filter is that it has no anti drain back valve that lots of other filters have. The only two filters without anti drain back valves that I've seen in person that fit skyactiv engines are the OEM and Wix filters exclusively for skyactiv engines.

Example below: the orange rubber anti drain back valve.
 
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2015 CX-5 GT
Why is not having an anti-drain back valve a good thing? Also, what is the difference between that and a bypass valve that allows oil to bypass the filter if the filter is clogged instead of, some say, the filter blowing off the engine?
 

erhayes

Contributor
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CX5 Reserve
When the oil filter is mounted so the base plate is facing down, the oil is not allowed to leak out and the valve that shuts this draining off is call the Anti drain back valve. . That way when the engine is started, the oil pump doesn't need to fill the filter before the galleys get oil pressure.
When the filtering material in a filter gets plugged up with particles so no oil can pass, the pressure builds up and the oil has nowhere to go until a valve opens to bypass the plugged material so they call it a bypass valve.

Some engines don't require the extra parts that are required for the addition anti drain back valve parts because the filter is mounted differently.
 
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MikeM.

MoMo
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2013 Mazda CX-5 Touring AWD 2.0L
Why is not having an anti-drain back valve a good thing? Also, what is the difference between that and a bypass valve that allows oil to bypass the filter if the filter is clogged instead of, some say, the filter blowing off the engine?

Because the oil filter in a CX-5 is mounted in an inverted position oil cannot drain out after the engine is shut down. An anti-drainback valve serves no purpose and adds unnecessary restriction to the free flow of oil circulation. That restriction is probably insignificant but why use a filter designed for a different vehicle?

The bypass valve is a fail-safe device set to open when/if the pressure behind the filter media reaches a pre-determined level. Depending upon the design of the lubrication system, engine designers will specify a suitable bypass blowoff pressure. If the bypass valve opens, oil bypasses the filter media and is returned to the engine unfiltered and pressure behind the filter media is relieved.
 

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