CX-5 Oil Filter - using longer one instead of OEM spec

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2013 Mazda CX-5, 2008 Mazda MX-5 Miata
Hi Everyone,

New member here. I was sure this topic would have been covered before, I searched but couldn't find relevant information so posting this thread.

I have a '08 Miata GT PRHT and a '13 CX-5 AWD. I've been maintaining the Miata myself for a while now but the CX-5 was always serviced at the dealer. The CX-5 completed 3 years this month and I thought it is time to know the car more intimately and start basic DIY maintenance on it. So today I rotated the tires and changed the oil (with Mobil 1) and filter (Purolator P1).

I like and trust Purolator filters (use them on the Miata) and while reading the online reviews on the Purolator PureOne PL14612, I noticed many comments that the PL14610 is same as the PL14612 in every way except that it is about 0.6 inch longer (3.52" vs 2.93") and so would actually provide more surface area for filtering if the engine bay had the room to fit the longer filter. I couldn't find this information for the CX-5 specifically but found it for other cars and even motorcycles.

So, I decided to give it a try and got the PL14610, and it fit perfectly on the CX-5. I was worried that the tabs on the bottom plastic cover might foul with the bottom of the filter, but it was a perfect fit. The car is running fine, but now I am getting second thoughts. Was I reckless in using a non-OEM spec filter? Will it cause problems with warranty if I ever needed to use it? Are there any issues/problems that may come up because of using the larger filter? Thanks for any thoughts and opinions.

Cheers!

For future reference, here are model numbers for the OEM spec filter and the longer filter from some popular brands:
Bosch 3300 vs 3323
Fram 6607 vs 7317
K&N 1008 vs 1010
Mobil1 M1-108 vs M1-110
Napa 7002 vs 7356
Purolator 14612 vs 14610
Wix 57002 vs 51356
 

erhayes

Contributor
:
CX5 Reserve
If the bypass valve setting is the same and the dimensions of the base/gasket is the same, you should be good to go. However; I always feel good about using a filter that is on the recommended list. I prefer OEM then Fram Ultra, then WIX myself. Ed
 
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13' CX-5 and 16' Mazda6 both Touring w/Tech/Bose
If you want to know tons about oil and oil filters you should check out the Bobistheoilguy website. Search around and you'll find many filters compared, sliced open, and tested.

That said aside from a quality oil and quality filter, the oil change interval is equally important. Our oil changes are via dealer using OEM filters with 0-20 Castrol Edge I believe. We change every 5-7K miles.
 
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2014 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech
I always use OEM. A long, long time ago a service manager explained it to me this way: "Who do you want to fix your engine if something goes wrong because of the oil filter; an oil filter company or the company that manufactured your engine?". Makes perfect sense to me.
 

MikeM.

MoMo
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2013 Mazda CX-5 Touring AWD 2.0L
So, I decided to give it a try and got the PL14610, and it fit perfectly on the CX-5. I was worried that the tabs on the bottom plastic cover might foul with the bottom of the filter, but it was a perfect fit.

There are a number of filters that fit the CX-5 perfectly but that don't meet the proper specs for bypass pressure.

The car is running fine, but now I am getting second thoughts. Was I reckless in using a non-OEM spec filter? Will it cause problems with warranty if I ever needed to use it? Are there any issues/problems that may come up because of using the larger filter? Thanks for any thoughts and opinions.

In my opinion, with the low cost and high quality of the OEM filter, I would need a very compelling reason to use something else. If you haven't verified that it has the same specs (primarily in terms of the specified bypass pressure) then it's an unknown. Plenty don't meet specs for Skyactiv engines and Mazda themselves has changed the filter they recommend at least once.

BTW, there is zero, and I mean zero, need for a bigger than recommended filter. No advantage there, you are over-thinking this. You still have to replace it every oil change to maintain warrantee protection of internal engine parts. A modern engine, manufactured to the type of tolerances attained with the CX-5 and considering the sophisticated computer controls with variable valve timing, etc. means there is very little need for filtering at all and the small filter specified is bigger than necessary by orders of magnitude under normal conditions.

For future reference, here are model numbers for the OEM spec filter and the longer filter from some popular brands:
Bosch 3300 vs 3323
Fram 6607 vs 7317
K&N 1008 vs 1010
Mobil1 M1-108 vs M1-110
Napa 7002 vs 7356
Purolator 14612 vs 14610
Wix 57002 vs 51356

A number of those filters contain internal anti-drainback valves which, considering the upside-down mounting of this filter on the CX-5, is useless. The OEM filter has no anti-drainback valve. I don't like unnecessary complications in my filters in order to make them a more universal fit. It's an additional point of potential restriction or failure due to manufacturing error. Simple is good in this case.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
If you want to know tons about oil and oil filters you should check out the Bobistheoilguy website. Search around and you'll find many filters compared, sliced open, and tested.
That said aside from a quality oil and quality filter, the oil change interval is equally important. Our oil changes are via dealer using OEM filters with 0-20 Castrol Edge I believe. We change every 5-7K miles.
Your Mazda dealer is good. My dealer is using a cheap brand of oil I've never heard of unless you specifically ask for Mazda moly 0W-20 or Castrol oil with additional cost.

I always use OEM. A long, long time ago a service manager explained it to me this way: "Who do you want to fix your engine if something goes wrong because of the oil filter; an oil filter company or the company that manufactured your engine?". Makes perfect sense to me.
Since many years ago I started to use OEM oil filter all the time. I always change oil by myself and I'd like to have some good quality parts been put in as my time is also valuable.

Unfortunately Mazda OEM oil filters are having some issues and certain recalls were issued. But looks like they're all involved with SkyActiv-D diesels.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
This dealer has an excellent parts/service department. They charge 79.99 for Castrol Syntec 0-20 and OEM Filter change + 4 tire rotation. Not to mention comes with free brake and battery test reports that we file away for records and I don't have to store/transport/discard used oil. I used to do my own oil changes but truth be told finding this dealership made me lazy LOL.
They also offer Royal Purple 0-20w at 99.99 too. Now if I did do my own changes I'd stick to OEM Filter + OEM Mazda Oil with the Molly.
So true! If I could find some good dealer like yours I may do the same as my back sometimes doesn't like me to do all of those DIY anymore! (boom08)
 
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2013 Mazda CX-5, 2008 Mazda MX-5 Miata
If you want to know tons about oil and oil filters you should check out the Bobistheoilguy website. Search around and you'll find many filters compared, sliced open, and tested.

That said aside from a quality oil and quality filter, the oil change interval is equally important. Our oil changes are via dealer using OEM filters with 0-20 Castrol Edge I believe. We change every 5-7K miles.
Yes, I've come across that site and I was happy to find that my trust in Purolator filters is not misplaced - they are well regarded and of very good quality. My choice of oil Mobil 1 Synthetic and I change the oil according to the manufacturer's recommendations (7.5K for th CX-5) or at least once a year (our Miata runs less than 4K a year).

There are a number of filters that fit the CX-5 perfectly but that don't meet the proper specs for bypass pressure.

In my opinion, with the low cost and high quality of the OEM filter, I would need a very compelling reason to use something else. If you haven't verified that it has the same specs (primarily in terms of the specified bypass pressure) then it's an unknown. Plenty don't meet specs for Skyactiv engines and Mazda themselves has changed the filter they recommend at least once.

BTW, there is zero, and I mean zero, need for a bigger than recommended filter. No advantage there, you are over-thinking this. You still have to replace it every oil change to maintain warrantee protection of internal engine parts. A modern engine, manufactured to the type of tolerances attained with the CX-5 and considering the sophisticated computer controls with variable valve timing, etc. means there is very little need for filtering at all and the small filter specified is bigger than necessary by orders of magnitude under normal conditions.

A number of those filters contain internal anti-drainback valves which, considering the upside-down mounting of this filter on the CX-5, is useless. The OEM filter has no anti-drainback valve. I don't like unnecessary complications in my filters in order to make them a more universal fit. It's an additional point of potential restriction or failure due to manufacturing error. Simple is good in this case.

After I started this thread, I found that this topic was discussed before - Larger oil filter option/s in here.
And I see what you are saying, there is no great benefit in using the larger filter, but the risk to warranty is not worth it. I guess I will switch to the recommended PL14612 (OEM spec) at the next oil change. Although by that time the car would most likely be near the end of the 4-yr warranty period and I won't have to worry about losing warranty coverage.

BTW, I did check the specs between the two filters and everything (including the relief pressure) is the same, the only thing different is the length.

Why did you decide your background trumps the engineers?
I didn't. The PL filter that fits CX-5 (PL14612) was OOS at my local store which was I started looking at the alternative PL14610.

But the engineers design the car to a price point. Every choice they make is a compromise between cost & performance/efficiency. So, to believe that there is no way to improve on the Mazda engineers' design is not correct. If that were so, there'd be no market for after-market headers, exhausts, shocks, struts, turbos, valves, cams etc. The Miata forum is full of discussions on how to improve upon the factory spec engine to squeeze out more performance.

The OEM oil filter is probably chosen as the one that meets the requirements and does the job at the least cost. Can there be a better oil filter at additional cost - sure, there are. Should you use them? That is up to you. Based on my experience, I believe that the Purolator PureOne (or Mobil1 or Wix or similar) is a better filter than the OEM filter and so I will stick to that until proven otherwise.

As to why a bigger filter is better? - It provides more surface area so quicker filtration and better oil flow. I don't have the knowledge to decide if the bigger filter is better or not for the CX-5 specifically, but there are several discussions on Bob's oil forum and they agree that if the bigger filter can physically fit in the space it offers a slight advantage. The PL14610 & PL14612 have the exact same specs except for the difference in length, so if your car has the PL14612 as the recommended fit you can safely switch to PL14610 if you want.
 
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2015 Mazda CX-5 Touring
If It's Under Warrenty..

My question would be: "If your vehicle is under warranty and something should happen (even if it doesn't), what prevents the dealership (or Mazda itself), from saying 'you didn't use the recommended and approved oil filter' and now they won't stand behind the year/mileage warranty"?

CX5T Lover
 
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2013 Mazda CX-5, 2008 Mazda MX-5 Miata
My question would be: "If your vehicle is under warranty and something should happen (even if it doesn't), what prevents the dealership (or Mazda itself), from saying 'you didn't use the recommended and approved oil filter' and now they won't stand behind the year/mileage warranty"?

CX5T Lover
See my reply to MikeM - I already accepted that the risk to warranty is not worth any small benefit that the bigger filter might provide.

FYI, the dealer or Mazda cannot simply deny warranty coverage just because I used an after-market oil filter (or any other part for that matter). As per the Magnuson–Moss Warranty Act they will have to prove that the specific part directly caused the need for warranty repair. But yes, it is an argument I can do without.
 
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Mazda
Just want to throw this in here, DO NOT use a non genuine Oil Filter in any Skyactiv Engine, diesel or gasoline.
These oil filters are specifically made and designed for Mazda by Tokyo Roki.
Non genuine oil filters do not have the correct by pass and flow rating.

Using the incorrect Oil Filter can also throw up DTC's (Diagnostic Trouble Codes, 'CEL' light on dash)

See PDF from Mazda USA ( for SA-G)
 

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Last edited:
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2016 CX-5 GT w/tech FWD
Just want to throw this in here, DO NOT use a non genuine Oil Filter in any Skyactiv Engine, diesel or gasoline.
These oil filters are specifically made and designed for Mazda by Tokyo Roki.
Non genuine oil filters do not have the correct by pass and flow rating.

Using the incorrect Oil Filter can also throw up DTC's (Diagnostic Trouble Codes, 'CEL' light on dash)

See PDF from Mazda USA ( for SA-G)

you beat me to it, hence my concern with the use of non OEM filters on Mazda. Thanks.

by the way the filter does have a new P/N now PE01-14-302A
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
... I believe that the Purolator PureOne (or Mobil1 or Wix or similar) is a better filter than the OEM filter
This statement is hard for me to agree with. Mazda designed the SkyActiv engine, including the specification for the oil filter. Mann+Hummel got the specification, "copied" it, and made the Purolator oil filter available to general public. Can a copied part be better than the original? Not likely! Most of time after-market products have to compromise to make it as a general-purpose part so that one filter can fit many different cars to save cost. For me, after-market parts can never be better than OEM parts.

... As to why a bigger filter is better? - It provides more surface area so quicker filtration and better oil flow.
Not necessary. Bigger filter is not always better! It really depends on how large the filtering area and how the filtering material packed. A smaller oil filter can pack more filtering material than a larger oil filter. And the filtering material can also make difference. Besides, Mazda has said the SkyActiv engines require unique OEM high-flow oil filter, using a conventional oil filter may cause the Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) stored.
 
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2013 Mazda CX-5, 2008 Mazda MX-5 Miata
Just want to throw this in here, DO NOT use a non genuine Oil Filter in any Skyactiv Engine, diesel or gasoline.
These oil filters are specifically made and designed for Mazda by Tokyo Roki.
Non genuine oil filters do not have the correct by pass and flow rating.

Using the incorrect Oil Filter can also throw up DTC's (Diagnostic Trouble Codes, 'CEL' light on dash)

See PDF from Mazda USA ( for SA-G)
Thank you for posting that information, it is news to me. Guess I should just stick with the OEM filter.

For me, after-market parts can never be better than OEM parts.
Wow!! that is a pretty strong statement. But its your opinion - I disagree with it but I respect it.

Not necessary. Bigger filter is not always better! It really depends on how large the filtering area and how the filtering material packed. A smaller oil filter can pack more filtering material than a larger oil filter. And the filtering material can also make difference. Besides, Mazda has said the SkyActiv engines require unique OEM high-flow oil filter, using a conventional oil filter may cause the Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) stored.
I didn't even know SkyActiv engines needed a special high-flow filter. So none of the after-market filters (even the expensive ones from the top brands) should be installed on a CX-5 because they all show the same filter model for the Mazda2 and CX-5. This is so not worth the time and bother, I will switch back to the OEM filter the next time I have the car up. Thanks.

I will email Purolator & Mobil 1 and see what they have to say about this.
And I will update this post if the CEL light comes or if the engine throws out any DTCs.

Thanks to everyone who participated, I am sticking with the OEM filter!!
 
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GA prior 16 CX5 GT
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20 CX5 GT + Prem
The filter is only as large as needed to reduce weight. My G35 used the same filter in a 3.5 V6 for over 100,000.
 
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GA prior 16 CX5 GT
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20 CX5 GT + Prem
It is only as large as needed to reduce weight. My G35 used the same filter for over 100,000 miles in a 3.5 V6...
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
I didn't even know SkyActiv engines needed a special high-flow filter. So none of the after-market filters (even the expensive ones from the top brands) should be installed on a CX-5 because they all show the same filter model for the Mazda2 and CX-5.
This is exactly what I was talking about! "Most of time after-market products have to compromise to make it as a general-purpose part so that one filter can fit many different cars to save cost." The OEM oil filters for Mazda CX-5 SkyActiv engine and Mazda2 look the same but in fact they are different characteristic wise. But after-market parts manufactures either may not know the difference as they are trying to copy them or they may just compromise to make one-for-two for cost saving purpose. It's simple, can you get a better quality copy than the original when you making a copy on the Xerox machine? No, definitely not! I know some high-end after-market parts or tuning manufactures may actually use better material than OEM. But that's for upgrade and not the routine maintenance parts like the oil filters we're discussing here. In general after-market parts manufactures have to sell their parts cheaper than OEM. They have to find a way to cut corners, hence it's hard to expect better quality than OEM.
 
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