Can I make my CX-7 reliable?

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2008 Mazda CX-7 Turbo 2017 Mazda 3 S
Hello Dear Forum Members

Just wondering if after fixing all the problems of the CX-7 (made the timing chain and VVT changing synthetic oil every 5,000 miles and now I have to replace the oil cooler) will it make a more reliable vehicle? I mean haven't touch the turbo but I am aware that this part could be next to fail, but just wondering if the after replacing the VVT and the oil cooler for a new redesigned one, will now make those parts reliable.

Thank you very much
 
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2010 CX-7
Personally I would get rid of it while it's still drivable and leave the Mazda brand altogether. We have a Mazda CX-7 with 84,000 miles on it and just had the engine turbo and AC compressor fail. Dealer wants $4k+ to repair, and Mazda is unwilling to assist with any of the cost. Shocking that a major engine component would fail so early but seems to be common issue based on what the dealer said and reviews on Edmonds. Shouldn't trust a company that doesn't stand behind their work
 
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CX7 2007 Sports
That's borderline a philosophical question, lol! First off, if you are within 7 years and 70,000 miles your VVT's tab should be picked up by Mazda as part of VVT Noise and Timing Chain Noise Warranty Extension SSP87.
My take, and I'm sure a lot of others will have a different angle... any used SUV/crossover will take more than just an oil change/ tire rotation maintenance and we need to expect components to go bad as the car ages (rubber cracks etc.). As long as no major components give in, and you continue to enjoy the swift handling and powerful acceleration, this remains a keeper but if indeed you start seeing a theme in major issues, time to part ways. Turbo and AC clutch are common issues. I'll add one to that: injector seals. A keeper in my view, but probably not above 200,000 miles.
 
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2010 CX-7 2.3L Turbo
Yep, I trade in my wife*s CX-7 3 years ago for a new Prius. We both miss the Mazda a lot. That car was awesome when it wasn*t in the shop. The Prius is reliable to a fault and dirt cheap to own. Total opposites
 
Personally I would get rid of it while it's still drivable and leave the Mazda brand altogether. We have a Mazda CX-7 with 84,000 miles on it and just had the engine turbo and AC compressor fail. Dealer wants $4k+ to repair, and Mazda is unwilling to assist with any of the cost. Shocking that a major engine component would fail so early but seems to be common issue based on what the dealer said and reviews on Edmonds. Shouldn't trust a company that doesn't stand behind their work
What year is it?
 

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
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Canada
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'18 CX-9 Signature
What year is it?

He's got a 2010 I believe, if the CX-7 he's talking about is the same one listed under his username. It sounds like in his case, his car was out of warranty and a goodwill repair was denied. That sucks, but to be fair, if a vehicle is out of warranty you can't really expect to company to do much (if anything). It's the same for anything with a warranty.

Anyway, in Yoopy's case, I think it'll boil down to how long they plan to keep the car, and whether or not it's worth it (to them) to keep it for that long. I'd start by doing as much research as possible in the CX-7 forum to determine common problems, when they happen, and how much they cost to fix. If I decided it would be worth keeping over the long term, I would budget/save for those potential problems. If they become actual problems, I'd have the money set aside to fix them.

Also, keep in mind that costs quoted by the dealer are usually inflated by a large margin due to the higher dealership shop rates. A capable independent mechanic can likely do the same job for a much cheaper price.
 
He's got a 2010 I believe, if the CX-7 he's talking about is the same one listed under his username. It sounds like in his case, his car was out of warranty and a goodwill repair was denied. That sucks, but to be fair, if a vehicle is out of warranty you can't really expect to company to do much (if anything). It's the same for anything with a warranty.

Anyway, in Yoopy's case, I think it'll boil down to how long they plan to keep the car, and whether or not it's worth it (to them) to keep it for that long. I'd start by doing as much research as possible in the CX-7 forum to determine common problems, when they happen, and how much they cost to fix. If I decided it would be worth keeping over the long term, I would budget/save for those potential problems. If they become actual problems, I'd have the money set aside to fix them.

Also, keep in mind that costs quoted by the dealer are usually inflated by a large margin due to the higher dealership shop rates. A capable independent mechanic can likely do the same job for a much cheaper price.
My '09 CX-7 has 94K on it and has behaved well ever since I bought it 3 years ago from original owners, my parents. It behaved well for them too. Pop was a stickler for keeping car well maintained & it's spent most of its rest time in a garage or carport.

Only things I don't like about it:
1. Tow capacity is only 1,000 lbs. (I'd rather have more)
2. Even though engine is turbocharged, it always takes about one second for the engine to kick in after I step on the gas. It's not instantaneous. Compared to a muscle car like a Dodge Challenger (which easily executes fast moves in traffic NOW) I get a split second of terror in my Mazda turbo before the power kicks in.
 

singlemalt_18

My Way IS the Highway
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2018 CX-9 Signature Silver & 2007 CX-7 GT AWD Liq Platinum
Slightly OT - I just had my original 2007 CX-7 GT AWD in the shop (private) for the transfer case seal repair. This was a known issue per a TSB for all 2007-08 models made before Oct 1 2007. The repair cost me just over $700. (90% of which was labor)

I bought it right out of the gate in August 2006. It has been garaged & maintained, and until 2018, only used on road trips. Now as a day beater with about 67k miles, this was the first non-maintenance/wear & tear service issue I've encountered. A small leak was detected a number of years ago, but was becoming more noticeable over the past year or so.

I feel very fortunate that I got a "good one" as I am aware of many of the issues associated with the early year CX-7s. Hopefully no really big ticket items are waiting to pounce; overall mileage may be comparatively low, but with 14 years of service in, I'm hoping time is on my side. These were incredibly fun cars to drive, and I was out on back roads putting it thru the moves just today.

If your car is in good shape, and you like it, sometimes the devil you know is better than the one you don't know.
 
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