Brake Pad Replacement - Easy?

:
2019 GTR
Hi guys,

I am going to replace the brake pads (or attempt to) on my nephews 2016.5 CX-5 GT. I have done brakes pads before, but wanted to make sure there's nothing "special" involved in replacing pads on a CX-5? I purchased some OEM pads, and rotors.

Thanks all!
 
:
Southwest Ohio
:
'19 CX-5 diesel
Yes. Special procedures for configuring the rear EPB into maintenance mode and dealing with calipers. It's not hard to do but you want to get it right. Other than that, I found them pretty easy to work on. There is much written about it.
 
:
Ottawa, Ontario
:
17 Mazda 6 GT
You'll want to google or search on here or the net about the rear brake replacement procedure, especially the requirement regarding maintenance mode.
Attempting to push or turn in the rear caliper piston without having gone into maintenance mode could result in a damaged caliper, (and a replacement required). Be careful.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Hi guys,

I am going to replace the brake pads (or attempt to) on my nephews 2016.5 CX-5 GT. I have done brakes pads before, but wanted to make sure there's nothing "special" involved in replacing pads on a CX-5? I purchased some OEM pads, and rotors.

Thanks all!
Make sure to read discussions on EPB Maintenance Mode created by tomcat1446:

Maintenance Mode for 2016/2017 CX-5 electronic brakes

Just don’t rotate the caliper piston on rear brakes!

453BA6EF-20B1-4902-BA0E-BC1DCB92756A.jpeg
 
:
2019 GTR
Thanks for all of the info guys. So, I am going to do the pads/rotors today or tomorrow, and noticed that the rotors appear to be in decent condition. I am pretty sure I could save some money and have them turned. Has anyone done this vs. replacing them? If so, have you had good luck with them wearing well? I am not sure which way to go here. My local Napa will turn rotors from what I've been told.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Thanks for all of the info guys. So, I am going to do the pads/rotors today or tomorrow, and noticed that the rotors appear to be in decent condition. I am pretty sure I could save some money and have them turned. Has anyone done this vs. replacing them? If so, have you had good luck with them wearing well? I am not sure which way to go here. My local Napa will turn rotors from what I've been told.
This’s really a personal preference. I usually turn the rotor all the time unless it’s getting close to thickness limit. Yes almost any auto parts store can do it for you. I simply feel it’s wasteful to throw away useful rotors.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Perfect! I'll give it a shot. Do the resurfaced rotors hold-up pretty good for you?
I haven’t replaced my rear rotors at 42K miles by myself on my 2016 CX-5 as I got full set of new rear brakes including revised calipers at about 28k miles from EPB dragging TSB under warranty. But I‘ve turned many rotors on other vehicles I’ve owned, including 3 times on front disk rotors for my 1998 Honda CR-V with 183K miles. There’s nothing wrong to reuse your old rotors which are properly turned, unless they’re warped、too thin、or have too much rust on them. Never had any problems.
 
Just another data point - I never turn rotors. If they need turning, I just replace them. They are not that expensive, and I feel taking off material just makes them more likely to warp in the future, especially in front.

If they are not badly scored, warped, or worn too thin (never seems to happen), I just reuse them. Our 2006 CRV with 180K miles still has original, unturned rotors and they look fine. I didn't replace rotors on my RAV4 until over 100K miles. Fords have been a different story, I rarely got more than 50K miles on the front (Windstar, F150) without them warping.

Mark
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA

If they are not badly scored, warped, or worn too thin (never seems to happen), I just reuse them.
The factory front rotors on my 2000 BMW 528i are “one-time-use” rotors. Once the factory pads are worn, the factory rotors are also too thin to be reused. The same on my every previous VW vehicles.
 
The thinner that you make your rotors the more that they will heat up and warp again. Nobody turns rotors any more.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
The thinner that you make your rotors the more that they will heat up and warp again. Nobody turns rotors any more.
Not true. We’re talking about almost unmeasurable area loss for heat dissipation by lathing a very thin layer of metal from rotor. Turning brake rotors down to remove the excess brake material from your pads and to prevent warping and grinding, thus extending the life of your brake pads. There‘s always a minimum thickness spec for brake rotor stated in factory service manual and even on factory rotor itself. The car engineers should know better giving you a minimum thickness spec for the rotor.

Every commercial brake shop and auto parts store still turns brake rotors nowadays as far as I know.
 
:
Ottawa, Ontario
:
17 Mazda 6 GT
Just thinking about the process for getting your rotors turned, and it seems to me it's a whole lot easier, and not much more expensive, to just go with new ones.
If you want to get them turned, you have to take them off the car, get a ride or use another vehicle to get to the garage/shop. Then wait for the job to be done, which could be minutes or hours long.
Then pay the shop for turning them, whatever that might be, and then run back to your car and start working on it again.
For a few bucks more, or maybe even the same money, you can easily order new rotors on line, get them delivered for free, and then do your brake job from start to finish with no interruptions.
Thoughts?
 
You'll want to google or search on here or the net about the rear brake replacement procedure, especially the requirement regarding maintenance mode.
Attempting to push or turn in the rear caliper piston without having gone into maintenance mode could result in a damaged caliper, (and a replacement required). Be careful.
What is this "maintenance mode" that you are talking about?
 
:
2020 CX-5 AWD
Just another data point - I never turn rotors. If they need turning, I just replace them. They are not that expensive, and I feel taking off material just makes them more likely to warp in the future, especially in front.

If they are not badly scored, warped, or worn too thin (never seems to happen), I just reuse them. Our 2006 CRV with 180K miles still has original, unturned rotors and they look fine. I didn't replace rotors on my RAV4 until over 100K miles. Fords have been a different story, I rarely got more than 50K miles on the front (Windstar, F150) without them warping.

Mark

Agree 100% with the above, and I too always reuse rotors on a brake pad change, unless their condition indicates they need to be replaced. As a DIYer, I have no problem with the possibility that I'd need to redo the job and replace the rotors, if it turned out that I missed some significant problem with them. However, I also understand why a shop would be much more proactive in pushing for new rotors (or turning them), because they never want to see a vehicle coming back due to problems with a brake job they did.
 
:
Pueblo county CO
:
CX-5 Sport 16.5 6M
The thinner that you make your rotors the more that they will heat up and warp again. Nobody turns rotors any more.
I find that unless the brakes are really pulsating it's ok to just leave the rotors alone. I've done that several times with no problem. Just break in the pads gradually to bed them to the shape of the rotors.
 
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