Anyone consider a used Luxury SUV for the price of a new CX-5?

erhayes

Contributor
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Mazda CX-5 FWD Touring
I have considered a BMW X3 and a RX350. The X3 is a great vehicle but, the high maintenance kills it for me. The RX350 drives nice and is luxurious is you can stand the snide comments about the front end styling. I have and enjoyed my 2014 CX5 and hope to buy a new 2022 CX5 unless the competition does something miraculous. ED
 
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Texas
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'19 MX-5, '20 CX-5
I then had my heart set on a 2019 CPO Acura RDX A-Spec (is Acura even considered luxury?) but even with 20K miles, price was about what a new GT Reserve went for.....really nice to look at but wasn't that fun to drive. The CX-5 to me feels more fun than the RDX - probably due to higher torque despite giving up some HP. Happy I went with the Mazda.
The differences aren't really significant unless you're competing, but technically the CX-5 turbo accelerates and brakes faster than an RDX A-Spec in all metrics according to Car and Driver instrumented testing.

Although Acura does have some unique platforms and powertrains in their lineup, they're closer to a higher trim level of Honda than a competitor to a true luxury brand.

My biggest reservation with Acura is that their initial quality has fallen to the bottom of the list next to Chrysler (!) and their long-term dependability is now below the industry average along with Honda.

I bought a new 2019 Acura RDX Advance that I had to dump at a big loss after 3.5 months because of problems. Unfortunately, the vehicle that replaced it, a 2019 Honda Ridgeline RTL-E was even worse. After a 15-year run with 11, mostly-good Hondas, it became painfully clear that the Honda of today is far removed from the Honda of the 80s and 90s that I grew to love. They've got big problems with both quality and customer service and seem to have realized and admitted to it last year, but I hope it's not too late.

After years of buying and advocating Honda vehicles, Mazdas have replaced the Hondas in my garage.
 

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
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Canada
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'18 CX-9 Signature
The differences aren't really significant unless you're competing, but technically the CX-5 turbo accelerates and brakes faster than an RDX A-Spec in all metrics according to Car and Driver instrumented testing.

Although Acura does have some unique platforms and powertrains in their lineup, they're closer to a higher trim level of Honda than a competitor to a true luxury brand.

My biggest reservation with Acura is that their initial quality has fallen to the bottom of the list next to Chrysler (!) and their long-term dependability is now below the industry average along with Honda.

I bought a new 2019 Acura RDX Advance that I had to dump at a big loss after 3.5 months because of problems. Unfortunately, the vehicle that replaced it, a 2019 Honda Ridgeline RTL-E was even worse. After a 15-year run with 11, mostly-good Hondas, it became painfully clear that the Honda of today is far removed from the Honda of the 80s and 90s that I grew to love. They've got big problems with both quality and customer service and seem to have realized and admitted to it last year, but I hope it's not too late.

After years of buying and advocating Honda vehicles, Mazdas have replaced the Hondas in my garage.
I read the entire thread that you had linked from RidgelineOwnersClub in a previous post. IMHO, you gave them every opportunity possible to make it right. It was surprising to see that they essentially left you in the cold with a wet blanket. I've owned a few Hondas (91 Accord, 99 Accord V6 and currently an 06 Civic DX), and they have all been pretty bulletproof, but I can't see myself buying a new Honda any time soon.

If the GT Reserve or Signature was available when I was shopping, I would have cross-shopped it with a 2-3 year old SQ5. It would have been a hard decision. Buying the CX-5 brand new means you take the hit on depreciation, while the CPO SQ5 has already depreciated a fair amount. On the flip side, Audi's reputation for reliability and expensive repairs isn't great, especially once you're out of warranty. IMO, peace of mind is important, so I think I would have ended up in a CX-5.
 
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Phoenix
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2020 CX5 signature
The differences aren't really significant unless you're competing, but technically the CX-5 turbo accelerates and brakes faster than an RDX A-Spec in all metrics according to Car and Driver instrumented testing.
Forget technically. Unless there was something way wrong with the 2019 RDX I drove, the CX-5 seems to have near instant power delivery from a stop (maybe the bigger 2.5 or maybe that fancy adjusting exhaust/turbo thingy) Downshifting, either manually or mashing the gas, seems super responsive with the CX-5 turbo also
 
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Texas
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'19 MX-5, '20 CX-5
Forget technically. Unless there was something way wrong with the 2019 RDX I drove, the CX-5 seems to have near instant power delivery from a stop (maybe the bigger 2.5 or maybe that fancy adjusting exhaust/turbo thingy) Downshifting, either manually or mashing the gas, seems super responsive with the CX-5 turbo also
Hehe! :) I'm not married to any one manufacturer - they don't pay my bills or give me free cars (for more than week at a time, anyway). I have owned and driven a lot of different vehicles. Having owned an RDX and now a CX-5, I can't deny that the RDX is a step above the CX-5 in most every category. The interior materials are better in the RDX. The audio system is far superior in the RDX. The exterior design is more upscale on the RDX. The CX-5 is a bit more economical. In terms of performance, they are very similar in a straight line and while braking. The RDX's dual-clutch, overdriven, torque-vectoring AWD system is undeniably superior to the CX-5's single-clutch AWD system with an open rear differential when cornering, but the vast majority of compact SUV owners will never drive under conditions where such differences become apparent.

Both the RDX and CX-5 (when running 93 octane) are very fun to drive in a spirited manner (as far as modestly-priced, compact SUVs are concerned). For $10K less than an RDX and arguably better reliability, the CX-5 is a very compelling package.

CX5_RDX.jpg
 
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20 Mazda CX5 Sig
Base Macan is going to cost a TON more than a CX5T to own, and performance on paper isn't very different, although I'm sure it's better balanced, but how hard are you REALLY pushing this class of vehicle vs. how much you want to spend to maintain it?
you're right. I would not have gone with the base if I'd purchased a Macan, so the difference would have been even greater. I'm happy I stayed practical, but... would like to own 1 Porsche before shuffling off this mortal coil...
 
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2017 Mazda CX-5 GT, 2016 Mazda6 iGT, 2014 Mazda3 sGT hatchback
I owned a '98 BMW 540iA for 9 yrs before dumping it for $9k.
If you ever think about owning (not leasing) a German luxury vehcile,
1. Don't buy it. Lease it.
2. Don't think about buying it at the end of lease.

After the first 4 yrs, I spent about $2k on average to keep the 540iA up and running. I got to know service advisors on first name basis. Entire cooling system was replaced on three repairs after being stranded on roadside three times..... Unforgettable experience. And, that was just 50% of the all the problems.

Now, 3 Mazdas in my house (Mazda3,Mazda6,CX5). Might add a CX30 soon for daughter.
Owned a '08 CX9 before trading it in for Mazda6.

I was a Honda/Acura owner before. Integra, Odyssey, Accord and Civic.
Yes. Honda/Acura reliability is slipping.

Just watched an internal video from Acura corporate to their dealers. The executives admit that reliability is one of their key focuses going forwards.
 
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2020 CX-5
I had a chance to take my Cayman S out on road course for a high performance driving experience. The instructor leading the cars around the course drove a Macan, one of the twin turbo models. I was struggling in a sports car to keep up the pace the instructor was setting in a SUV. Of course the instructor was professional driver who had done probably thousands of laps on this course. I don't know what the maintenance costs of Macan are; an oil change and routine annual service on the Cayman comes close to $500.

you're right. I would not have gone with the base if I'd purchased a Macan, so the difference would have been even greater. I'm happy I stayed practical, but... would like to own 1 Porsche before shuffling off this mortal coil...
 
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cx5
I'm considering a new or slightly used CX5 Turbo vs a 2017/18 Acura RDX CPO, right now.

The RDX is not as much fun to drive but the interior is more upscale, and the RDX has a pretty great V6 279HP engine, which I think I prefer over the turbo for longevity, I keep cars a long time.

The RDX Tech package also has much better stereo than the CX5. A CPO 17/18 RDX with Tech package with low mileage can be bought for around 27/28K, I drove one with 9K miles on it last weekend. Acura's CPO warranty sounds pretty darn good

The CX5 feels more youthful than the RDX. The RDX is more roomy. I like the handling better and the more simple dash on the CX5. I have also read that the seats are uncomfortable on longer trips on the CX5, which might be a deal killer. I am also concerned about the loss of power issue in cold weather on the CX5 turbo, which might be the biggest deal killer, I live in MI

Decisions Decisions????
 
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Texas
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'19 MX-5, '20 CX-5
Unlike the 2019-current RDX, the 2013-2018 model was basically a CR-V with a V6 - it even shared the CR-V's less-capable AWD system during those years (it doesn't have SH-AWD like other Acuras which overdrives the rear wheels and provides torque vectoring).
 
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cx5
Unlike the 2019-current RDX, the 2013-2018 model was basically a CR-V with a V6 - it even shared the CR-V's less-capable AWD system during those years (it doesn't have SH-AWD like other Acuras which overdrives the rear wheels and provides torque vectoring).
Hmm, thanks for pointing that out. I live in MI so that could be an issue, Is the CRV system crappy? Is the CX5 system superior to the 17/18 RDX?

I drive a Tacoma double cab so Im used to a good 4WD system in snow
 
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Texas
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'19 MX-5, '20 CX-5
Hmm, thanks for pointing that out. I live in MI so that could be an issue, Is the CRV system crappy? Is the CX5 system superior to the 17/18 RDX?

I drive a Tacoma double cab so Im used to a good 4WD system in snow
The 2013-2018 RDX's AWD system is fundamentally similar to the CX-5's in that it's really "two-wheel drive" at best (one front wheel and one rear wheel). The 1G and 3G RDX's AWD system is much more capable because it can send power to both rear wheels (or just to one wheel) without having to use the brakes.

Honda/Acura's AWD systems at a glance from the least capable to the most capable:

  • Real-Time AWD (send power to an open rear differential only when front wheel slip occurs)
  • Real-Time AWD with Intelligent Control System (sends power to an open rear differential before front wheel slip occurs)
  • VTM-4 (sends power to both rear wheels for the best traction)
  • iVTM-4/SH-AWD* (sends power to one or both rear wheels for the best traction and handling)

*Note: There have been four generations of Acura SH-AWD - some of them work differently.

Mazda's AWD system is most similar to Honda's RTAWD w/ICS which is also used on the 2013-2018 RDX and has been used on the CR-V since 2012.
 
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North of Toronto
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2019 CX-9 Sig
Hmm, thanks for pointing that out. I live in MI so that could be an issue, Is the CRV system crappy?
I'll go out on limb and say if snow is your concern, both will do fine. I'm sure some would disagree.

It's the handling where i see the Acura having advantage.

I'm in Canada but not a super snowy area, I've not had issues in '17 CRV with traction. I run on x-ice though.
 
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North of Toronto
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2019 CX-9 Sig
Although Acura does have some unique platforms and powertrains in their lineup, they're closer to a higher trim level of Honda than a competitor to a true luxury brand.
This is true in reputation, but it's a shame. Would I take the infiniti with CVT over MDX? Nope. Same for extended Lexus RX. Reviews favour MDX's driving dynamics over both.

And RDX is competitive too. The infiniti QX50 not well reviewed, and the NX is just small and dated.

Obviously the german brands are another story.
 
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was 175ps Mazda CX-5 Auto AWD Sport Nav, now 190ps DSG Tiguan 4M
I bought a 190ps auto 4motion swb Tiguan 18 month ago, no regrets and 100% reliability unlike both cx5 I had.

For those who want power a R type with around 300ps is due out.

4motion gives 10% to the rear minimum all times.
 
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CX5 GT-R
I bought a 190ps auto 4motion swb Tiguan 18 month ago, no regrets and 100% reliability unlike both cx5 I had.

For those who want power a R type with around 300ps is due out.

4motion gives 10% to the rear minimum all times.
Tiguan is a very flexible chassis. I'm very sensitive to that.
 
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was 175ps Mazda CX-5 Auto AWD Sport Nav, now 190ps DSG Tiguan 4M
I've had the wheels off a couple of times now, usually once a year and not noticed any difference to a cx5.

Tiguan is much better protected and less prone to rust compared to a cx5, but I still prefer the cx5 diesel, I think the twin turbo makes a difference.

Having said that I have zero oil rise with the Tiguan, and love the digital dash.
 
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CX5 GT-R
I've had the wheels off a couple of times now, usually once a year and not noticed any difference to a cx5.
Tiguan is much better protected and less prone to rust compared to a cx5, but I still prefer the cx5 diesel, I think the twin turbo makes a difference.

Having said that I have zero oil rise with the Tiguan, and love the digital dash.
The videos I've seen indicate otherwise.
Skip to 14:30.
 
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2017 BMW X1
After a 15-year run with 11, mostly-good Hondas, it became painfully clear that the Honda of today is far removed from the Honda of the 80s and 90s that I grew to love. They've got big problems with both quality and customer service and seem to have realized and admitted to it last year, but I hope it's not too late.

After years of buying and advocating Honda vehicles, Mazdas have replaced the Hondas in my garage.
IMO, Nissan and Honda have switched places with Hyundai and Kia in terms of Asian car brand quality. The former are now synonymous with uninspired rental car-grade junk, while the latter are innovating and putting out intriguing cars that appear to be trouble-free.
 
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