Any performance improvement with a K&N air filter in the turbo engine?

I'm evaluating replacing the original (engine) air filter with a K&N air filter. My CX-5 is turbo, so there would be any noticeable difference in performance that is worth changing or should I keep the original?
 
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CX5 GT
yes it does help a bit but filtration is hit or miss if you live in a very dusty area.
i.e. desert areas, etc.
If the air where you live is clean of dust go for it.
I have always put kn in my turbo cars (many miles) and was happy with the results.
 

shadonoz

SkyActiv Member
Contributor
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State of Jefferson
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2017 CX-5 GT AWD+
I'm evaluating replacing the original (engine) air filter with a K&N air filter. My CX-5 is turbo, so there would be any noticeable difference in performance that is worth changing or should I keep the original?

If there's a difference, it will be subtle.
 

ColoradoDriver

Gen-1 Kodo Design
Contributor
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Denver, CO
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2014 CX-5 Touring
I put in an AEM dryflow filter for my non-turbo. At best, it feels a bit more responsive off the line and when I need to punch it. At worst, I'm sure it's not filtering as well as a result. I feel like the NA engine breathes a little easier and being at higher altitude, I feel like I felt a difference going to it from the OEM. But I'm also sure that extra breathability has a trade off in filtering ability.

Going to see how my next UOA (I still need to mail off my last one, oops) turns out and either keep with it, or go back to OEM. I bought it primarily because I liked the idea of one filter I can wash and reuse. I think I'll be ok being garaged and not driving on dusty or dirt roads anymore. I didn't really get it for any perceived performance increase. As for the K&N, I've read too much stuff online with people over oiling, or even just as its supposed to be messing up their MAF sensors. No thanks.
 
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2013 Mazda CX-5 Sport FWD Auto
Dang it CO, you beat me to it lol. I have the AEM dry flow filter, too. It*s supposed to filter very well being a synthetic media. I*ve rinsed mine probably twice using the AEM spray and it still looks really good. I*d skip a K & N filter. Too risky.
 

Avoidin Deer

Zoom Zoom, baby
Contributor
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Central Virginia
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2019 CX-5 Reserve
Did K&N finally release a filter for the 2.5L turbo?

I sent them an email a few months ago and they did not offer one at that time, and I still only see the 2.5L non-turbo listed.

The only air filter offered for the 2019 CX-5 2.5L is the same part number as the air filter for the 2017 CX-5 2.5L
 
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2019 CX-5 GT 184 2.2 twin turbodiesel auto - Sonic Silver
K&N filters make an awful noise. Vehicle manufacturers spend a great deal of time suppressing intake noise.
 
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13' CX-5 and 16' Mazda6 both Touring w/Tech/Bose
I put in an AEM dryflow filter for my non-turbo. At best, it feels a bit more responsive off the line and when I need to punch it. At worst, I'm sure it's not filtering as well as a result. I feel like the NA engine breathes a little easier and being at higher altitude, I feel like I felt a difference going to it from the OEM. But I'm also sure that extra breathability has a trade off in filtering ability.

Going to see how my next UOA (I still need to mail off my last one, oops) turns out and either keep with it, or go back to OEM. I bought it primarily because I liked the idea of one filter I can wash and reuse. I think I'll be ok being garaged and not driving on dusty or dirt roads anymore. I didn't really get it for any perceived performance increase. As for the K&N, I've read too much stuff online with people over oiling, or even just as its supposed to be messing up their MAF sensors. No thanks.

Professional offroad truck racers prefer the AEM dryflow filter over the K&N due to its performance and ability to filter out dust. Now that's an extreme condition. 1 micron filtration is good enough to keep the engine clean as daily drivers imho. http://www.mrcardesign.de/images/stories/Downloads/AEM/08_dryflow.pdf

That said, anyone wanting to get an OEM style replaceable filter should look into getting the one from CarQuest. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GS69owXpGdY
 

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
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Canada
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'18 CX-9 Signature
Sounds beautiful to my ears.

Same here. But, when you consider the market the CX-5 is marketed to and the direction that the company is going, Anchorman makes a great point. All that sound insulation is redundant if you make the sound coming from the engine bay louder. All depends on your personal preferences.
 
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Soon to be 2.5T CX-5
Same here. But, when you consider the market the CX-5 is marketed to and the direction that the company is going, Anchorman makes a great point. All that sound insulation is redundant if you make the sound coming from the engine bay louder. All depends on your personal preferences.

Already know.

Were talking aftermarket parts here. The personal preference is already taken into account, you either buy it because you like it or you dont, its not forced upon thee. No harm either way.
 

Natey

Moderator
Contributor
Patron
Also, remember there's no magic filter. If it flows better, it filters less, and vice versa. The paper stock ones are a great trade off and are cheap & easy to find at any auto parts store.
 
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2014 Ford Explorer Sport, 2009 CX9(Wife's)
Also, remember there's no magic filter. If it flows better, it filters less, and vice versa. The paper stock ones are a great trade off and are cheap & easy to find at any auto parts store.

Not necessarily.
My company developed a new filter media to replace existing.
The new media is lower restriction and higher efficiency.
This is for diesel engine filtration, but not for automotive applications.
 
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CX5 GT-R
Not necessarily.
My company developed a new filter media to replace existing.
The new media is lower restriction and higher efficiency.
This is for diesel engine filtration, but not for automotive applications.

Cosworth makes a great filter. Not for CX5 thought (yet?)