2020 GT Right Blind Spot Works 1/3 of time

L
GA prior 16 CX5 GT
V
20 CX5 GT + Prem
Just got a 2020 GT with Premium replacing my 2016 GT which replaced my 2013 GT. About 2/3 of the vehicles in the lane to the right are not detected by the Blind Spot Mirror. Anyone else have this problem? I love the Active Driving Display, Ventilated Seats, Seat Memory and Apple Carplay.
 
V
2019 Mazda CX-5 GT Reserve
Just got a 2020 GT with Premium replacing my 2016 GT which replaced my 2013 GT. About 2/3 of the vehicles in the lane to the right are not detected by the Blind Spot Mirror. Anyone else have this problem? I love the Active Driving Display, Ventilated Seats, Seat Memory and Apple Carplay.
Compared to other vehicles, the blind spot detection on the CX-5 seems to be back further then what I'm used to. On both my previous VW Golf & my wife's Subaru Outback the detected zone seems to be more in keeping in what I consider the "traditional blind spot". It's taken me a bit of adjusting to get used to the zone being back further.
I'm so used to the heads up display on the CX-5 that I miss it when I drive our Outback. I also love the ventilated seats & heated steering wheel.
 
V
CX-5 AWD, 2017
The blind spot warning on my 2017 CX5, register each and every time on both sides and as I get older and have problem turning my head to glance over my shoulder, have begun to rely more and more on the well adjusted outer mirror and blind spot warning.
 
V
2017 Mazda CX-5 GT, 2016 Mazda6 iGT, 2014 Mazda3 sGT hatchback
To OP. I have no problem with my '17 CX5. I have had BSM since my '08 CX9. I know how it should work. Based on what you described, a trip to dealership is needed, IMHO.
 

Avoidin Deer

Central Virginia
Contributor
V
2019 CX-5 Reserve
I've got a 2019 GT Reserve. I've never had an issue like that.

My only observation is that at highway speeds the BSM system does not give speed-appropriate warnings; in other words, to my conservative way of driving, the warning should go off when the cars are farther away when I'm doing highway speeds. It seems to be fine at sub-45 MPH speeds.
 

Ronzuki

South Central PA
L
2018 CX5 Touring
V
w/ Pref Pkg
I've got a 2019 GT Reserve. I've never had an issue like that.

My only observation is that at highway speeds the BSM system does not give speed-appropriate warnings; in other words, to my conservative way of driving, the warning should go off when the cars are farther away when I'm doing highway speeds. It seems to be fine at sub-45 MPH speeds.
Conservative driving has absolutely nothing to do with vehicular automation. From an automation perspective, in order for this BS feature to be useful (in other words reliable under all driving conditions all of the time), the BSM would need to know the rate of closure of the vehicle(s) approaching you...in conjunction with your speed. It doesn't, and it can't...not for the dollars they can afford to throw at a car's (lack of) control system. Maybe in the future, but certainly not today unless you want to be paying $100k for a CX5. These systems are nothing more than pre-cursor to the full autonomy pipe-dream of. Mere attempts to play around with ideas and concepts that we're the guinee-pig beta testers of and are forced to pay for. The other problem is lack of standards here...you get in one car and it behaves one way. Jump in to the wife's car that you don't drive and it behaves differently, only you've become accustomed to something different. That's when and how the automation causes accidents that otherwise likely wouldn't have happened. Much like the SBS nearly getting me rear-ended several times. The automation must adapt not the other way around, plain and simple.
 

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
L
Canada
V
'18 CX-9 Signature
Here's a video from Mazda.ca showing the BSM and how it works.


This is what I'd do. First, I'd head down to the dealership and advise them of the issues I'm having with the BSM on the right side. It could possibly be a faulty radar sensor, and they may be willing to swap it out. If they're not interested in helping me out, I'd borrow a friend's car (and the friend) and take both cars to an empty parking lot. I'd park my car, then measure 24-25 ft from the rear of my car and park the borrowed car there, in the space where it would be in the next lane over and in my blind spot. Then, I'd sit in my car and shoulder check to get an idea of how far the borrowed car is from my point of view, then get on a main road and attempt to recreate that distance with the borrowed car following me (or any other car). If the BSM still won't trigger after confirming that vehicles are following closely enough to trigger it, I'd take it back to the dealer and report my findings. If they were still unwilling to assist, I'd escalate accordingly (as described in the owner's manual). It would help a lot if there was recorded video of the "experiment" so there's something to show them in conjunction with Mazda.ca's video of the BSM in action.
 

Avoidin Deer

Central Virginia
Contributor
V
2019 CX-5 Reserve
The BSM radar sensors are also used for the Rear Cross Traffic Alert. Maybe next time you're at the store you could sit in Reverse in an appropriate location and see if the system behaves differently for traffic coming from each direction. Or at least sit so you can test the side you're having issues with.

It would be another data point for your dealer discussions.
 

Avoidin Deer

Central Virginia
Contributor
V
2019 CX-5 Reserve
Conservative driving has absolutely nothing to do with vehicular automation. From an automation perspective, in order for this BS feature to be useful (in other words reliable under all driving conditions all of the time), the BSM would need to know the rate of closure of the vehicle(s) approaching you...in conjunction with your speed. [snip]
Actually, your comment and sm1ke's video reminded me...this is Blind Spot Monitoring, not "You have safe-enough room to merge." It's only to monitor the blind spot. The rest it up to me to use the mirrors and to drive normally. After all, I was able to see the car in order to complain that it was too close for me to merge; therefore, it was not in my blind spot.

My expectation was flawed.
 

Ronzuki

South Central PA
L
2018 CX5 Touring
V
w/ Pref Pkg
Actually, your comment and sm1ke's video reminded me...this is Blind Spot Monitoring, not "You have safe-enough room to merge." It's only to monitor the blind spot. The rest it up to me to use the mirrors and to drive normally. After all, I was able to see the car in order to complain that it was too close for me to merge; therefore, it was not in my blind spot.

My expectation was flawed.
Precisely why I've complained about having this BSM (useless pricey tech) and NOT having simple heated mirrors on $30k mid level model car here in the N.E.

Flawed expectations... precisely why standards are required, so the learned and experienced behavior produces expectations that are identical across all "cars". We have an industry term we use for this type of "winging it" automation...it's simply referred to as half-azzed automation. Definitely not how you want your work to be defined, and once you're accused of it, your reputation suffers as a result for pretty much your entire career.

People will, and have incorrectly, assumed that it's OK to use automation technology as they see fit. (just because you can, doesn't mean you should). And then, are surprised/shocked/appalled when the resulting outcome is not so favorable (death/injury/expense). Technology such as this garbage in our cars will always be mis-applied and misused. Think Tesla not-so "auto-pilot". If one is not assuming/thinking/planning for misuse, or incorrect use, in one's design...well, then one is well on their way to failure. A very fundamental automation issue the automotive boys (and many others) have not yet figured out or come to grips with. They'll let their marketing and legal teams sort it all out.
 

Ronzuki

South Central PA
L
2018 CX5 Touring
V
w/ Pref Pkg
Here's a video from Mazda.ca showing the BSM and how it works.


This is what I'd do. First, I'd head down to the dealership and advise them of the issues I'm having with the BSM on the right side. It could possibly be a faulty radar sensor, and they may be willing to swap it out. If they're not interested in helping me out, I'd borrow a friend's car (and the friend) and take both cars to an empty parking lot. I'd park my car, then measure 24-25 ft from the rear of my car and park the borrowed car there, in the space where it would be in the next lane over and in my blind spot. Then, I'd sit in my car and shoulder check to get an idea of how far the borrowed car is from my point of view, then get on a main road and attempt to recreate that distance with the borrowed car following me (or any other car). If the BSM still won't trigger after confirming that vehicles are following closely enough to trigger it, I'd take it back to the dealer and report my findings. If they were still unwilling to assist, I'd escalate accordingly (as described in the owner's manual). It would help a lot if there was recorded video of the "experiment" so there's something to show them in conjunction with Mazda.ca's video of the BSM in action.
Excellent process to validate function....however, too much work for me just to prove this non-sense doesn't work in order to 'maybe' have an inexperienced mechanic (not technician) solve the issue. I have better things to do with my free time than Mazda's QC testing on a new car I paid for. They want to give me the car or pay my billable rate, I'd be happy to assist.

But alas, get used to it...more tech, more aggravation.
 

Avoidin Deer

Central Virginia
Contributor
V
2019 CX-5 Reserve
We have an industry term we use for this type of "winging it" automation...it's simply referred to as half-azzed automation. Definitely not how you want your work to be defined, and once you're accused of it, your reputation suffers as a result for pretty much your entire career.
On a related--yet different--note...

I've been a "power" computer user since the early 1980s. I observed that when memory and hard drives were of limited capacity and were expensive, the quality of programming was much higher (man, I miss MemMaker). Now that capacities are so huge and are so cheap, economics demand "winging it" when programming because efficiencies are not longer required and cost & speed don't really suffer due to slop. I have seen quality and standards (on so many levels of life) degrade horribly.

Better/faster/cheaper/shoddier.
 

erhayes

Contributor
V
Mazda CX-5 FWD Touring
I just adapt to what ever vehicle I happen to own at a time. If found out long ago that if I try change what frustrates me all the time It it quickly becomes a lose lose situation. I think this is an example, so just learn to use the system you have. Ed
 

Avoidin Deer

Central Virginia
Contributor
V
2019 CX-5 Reserve
I just adapt to what ever vehicle I happen to own at a time. If found out long ago that if I try change what frustrates me all the time It it quickly becomes a lose lose situation. I think this is an example, so just learn to use the system you have. Ed
Right.

This technology supports, it does not supplant.
 

Ronzuki

South Central PA
L
2018 CX5 Touring
V
w/ Pref Pkg
Don't need the "support", don't want the support, and should not be expected (or forced) in to paying for the support.
 

Latest threads

Latest resources

Top