2019 CX-5: Always chilly, "draft" around legs when trying to use heater. Why!?

AVC

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'17 CX-5 Select
My wife's Pilot runs the footwell ducts quie a bit warmer than the dash ducts in the Winter, which is far more comfortable.
 
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Mazda 6 Tourer
We in the UK had exactly this problem with our new (climate control) 2015 CX5. On a long journey it would blast cold air in to the passenger's side and we could do nothing about it. My wife found it unbearable in the front and the back seat. It went back to the dealer twice but they could find no problem. Nothing wrong with its 2017 replacement. I did post on the UK forum at the time.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
My wife's Pilot runs the footwell ducts quie a bit warmer than the dash ducts in the Winter, which is far more comfortable.
Actually warmer air to the footwell ducts should be a standard heating design in the vehicle. Warmer air is rising while the colder air is sinking, hence the warmer air should be more concentrated to the footwell outlets. And this’s always true on the vehicles I’ve owned even on my 1974 Chevy Impala. But our CX-5 seems to be different on this than everybody else. Another example that Mazda is trying too hard to be different from everybody else.
 
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2017 Mazda CX-5 GS
Actually warmer air to the footwell ducts should be a standard heating design in the vehicle. Warmer air is rising while the colder air is sinking, hence the warmer air should be more concentrated to the footwell outlets. And this’s always true on the vehicles I’ve owned even on my 1974 Chevy Impala. But our CX-5 seems to be different on this than everybody else. Another example that Mazda is trying too hard to be different from everybody else.
That's interesting. This is my first Mazda, and first winter with it. Our experience has been that on auto, it very quickly blasts warm air to defrost. Then when the temp. gets to about 120 splits between defrost and footwell. Soon after, as the engine temp rises, it goes to all footwell. Usually the timing of these changes seems perfect, but occasionally, on a particularly humid and frosty morning, I have to push it back to to a split between the windshield and the footwell. In other words, it sometimes give too much of the flow to the footwell.

Most of the time, I find that setting the temp at 68 is plenty of heat. We might drop it below that on a longer drive. On mornings like this one, it’s -18F today, I will have it set at 72. It takes about 10 minutes to get enough heat in the car that I begin to lower the fan speed manually. Within 15 minutes the car is good and warm, and I generally start to dial the temperature down. Of course, I’m not trying to wear shorts and flip flops in the car in these temperatures either.

Out Tacoma heats up better, but it’s a much smaller space. The CX 5's heater is better than out Outback was, and as good or better than the BMW X5 was, so we are happy with it.

Some here are referencing “cold” temperatures in the 40’s and 20’s above zero. If your car isn't warming at those temps, something is seriously wrong.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
That's interesting. This is my first Mazda, and first winter with it. Our experience has been that on auto, it very quickly blasts warm air to defrost. Then when the temp. gets to about 120 splits between defrost and footwell. Soon after, as the engine temp rises, it goes to all footwell. Usually the timing of these changes seems perfect, but occasionally, on a particularly humid and frosty morning, I have to push it back to to a split between the windshield and the footwell. In other words, it sometimes give too much of the flow to the footwell.

Most of the time, I find that setting the temp at 68 is plenty of heat. We might drop it below that on a longer drive. On mornings like this one, it’s -18F today, I will have it set at 72. It takes about 10 minutes to get enough heat in the car that I begin to lower the fan speed manually. Within 15 minutes the car is good and warm, and I generally start to dial the temperature down. Of course, I’m not trying to wear shorts and flip flops in the car in these temperatures either.

Out Tacoma heats up better, but it’s a much smaller space. The CX 5's heater is better than out Outback was, and as good or better than the BMW X5 was, so we are happy with it.

Some here are referencing “cold” temperatures in the 40’s and 20’s above zero. If your car isn't warming at those temps, something is seriously wrong.
I forgot to mention that the situation I described, or AVC too, is to use “Bi-level” mode where the heated air coming out from both dash vents and footwell vents. Although I have Automatic Climate Control, I have never used it in Auto mode as I prefer to use the HVAC in Manual mode.
 
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Well, after all this time, AVC's post came in closest to what answer the dealer finally provided. With the covid problem along with our being 85 miles or so from dealer, it was a month ago I got to the dealer and questioned them more. One of their fellows came out to our CX-5, said he had exactly the same car, and demonstrated that when he turned temp control all the way up, just past the 81 degree display, (I think it was 81), the next thing displayed was, "Hi." THEN, with the vent icon showing down only the system actually blew out really warm air at floor level. After that, he added to continue floor heat, leave the temp at Hi and use the fan speed to find cabin temp I liked. Well, ..... OK, I guess, but it makes no sense at all to me anything would be designed this way. Even at low fan speed, an 81 degree warm air flow from the floor will quickly provide high temp all through the cabin which we would never want. Perhaps using his advice initially we can get warm feet and then begin manipulating all the heater controls to find another balance. We've not tried this yet.
This is my only real complaint on this car so far.
This is my update.......