2017 CX-5 GPS Tracker / Battery Killer Help, Please?

:
2017 CX-5 GT
IMG_20200318_124819.jpg


Hi, I've got a 2017 CX-5 that has some sort of dealer installed GPS device that I'm mostly convinced kills my car's battery after it sits for a few days. The dealer has checked the car and says it is okay, but I come home from a trip after a few days and have to jump start my car.

So, I'd like to remove this thing, but am not sure about all of the connections and was hoping someone with some knowledge might be able to help? A description run-down based on the picture:

(A) is a led with a button that connects directly to (B). I didn't get any info from the dealer on what this does - they said the car was a dealer trade and it was installed by the prior dealer, but I called them too and they said they don't install these! Who knows?

(B) is the control box. It has 4 connections: the led/button thing and three other that go into harness (C).

(C) is my biggest question as it seems to be a factory harness the way it is routed and disappears to the fusebox below, but if I were to disconnect this from box (B), I wouldn't know where they go.

(D) seems like a jumper OBD cable that would be removed, but I can't see that any of those wires other than the power and ground (E) look to connect anywhere.

Any ideas? Thanks so much for taking a look!
 
:
GA prior 16 CX5 GT
:
20 CX5 GT + Prem
Some insurance companies offer lower rates for putting speed monitors/gps trackers on cars, might try that angle...
 
:
2017 CX-5 GT
Some insurance companies offer lower rates for putting speed monitors/gps trackers on cars, might try that angle...
Thanks - yes, my insurance gives a discount for GPS tracking, but I think I'd rather have a car that starts after a few days of sitting. I think I'll leave it there but see if there is a way to disconnect it.
 
:
Pueblo county CO
:
CX-5 Sport 16.5 6M
I have a 'Lojack' on mine someplace but I would be surprised if it could run the battery down in less than several weeks.
I have the original 2016.5 battery and I did have to give it a good charge but it is ok for more than a week.

I don't know anything about Lojack but I guess it uses GPS.
 
:
2019 CX-5 GTR
Not sure of the device (zip tie is covering the logo on part B; looks like letters PUR _ _ T) -- definitely NOT factory and is a very poor install all around. If you are not comfortable removing it, I suggest using a local stereo/alarm installation shop for removal - I would guess an hour labor should cover the removal.
 
:
92 MX-3; 18 CX-5
Start at the B control box and follow the wires. That box and everywhere it is tapping into various parts of the factory harness need to be disconnected.
I suspect the OBD connector is still open behind "A".
A sewing seam ripper can be useful for cutting the tape without damaging the wires. Liquid electrical tape may be useful to repair where you find the scotch lock insulation piercing taps that might have been used.
If this is an aftermarket device that you do not use then get rid of it. But this may not be the current drain on your battery.
 
:
'16.5 Mazda CX-5
Unplug the OBD II connector and pull the fuse in that black bulge near your letter "D". Then see if the battery lives longer. If it does, Bob's your uncle! If it were mine, I'd take it all out; it's not OEM. Some similar devices have been reported on Miata.net. They have one wire for the ignition that is cut to install the device. You may need to reconnect that wire, based on color code with a crimped butt splice.

These are usually found by second owners when they cause trouble. They are thought to be trackers to help finance companies repossess the car. One guy disabled his and soon got a call from his finance company.
 

Avoidin Deer

Zoom Zoom, baby
Contributor
:
Central Virginia
:
2019 CX-5 Reserve
These are usually found by second owners when they cause trouble. They are thought to be trackers to help finance companies repossess the car. One guy disabled his and soon got a call from his finance company.
I typed out a bunch of questions for you but then searched for the answers.

These are not only trackers, some also have starter interrupters. They're often installed by used car dealers who finance the deal ("Bring a pay stub and drive away!!!"), but I read of cars being purchased from dealers and the 3rd party finance company required it as a condition of providing the loan. Obviously for the high-risk folks, but at least it gets them behind the wheel.

I read a 2017 article stating that the FTC is looking into the practice, especially the starter-interrupter units. The concerns mostly center around privacy/tracking issues, but there's been no evidence of abuse.
 
:
16 CX-5 Tour'ngAWD
I'm guessing it gets its power from the OBD port. That is definitely a mess. Start with stuff that can be put back easily like the fuse or unplugging the OBD connector. If nothing bad happens, start systematically dismantling the device and wires.

I'm curious what the button on the Part A/LED switch does. Reset? Programmer? On/Off?

Can you get a name or part number off the black box? That should get you more information as to what it does; but not necessarily who installed it. edit: Looks like the word "Pursuit" is on the black box (prosvr.com perhaps?)


On the dead battery...have you checked the fluid level (by looking) in each of the cells of the battery. My 4yo battery was almost bone dry and was causing a no-start condition every couple of weeks. I put a battery tender on it and the light never changed from red indicating it was always charging.

Once I put about 2-3 oz of distilled water in 5/6 cells (removed the little cap on top), the charger made it all the way to the charged/float stage.

Adding some distilled water to the battery is a stop gap measure and should only be done once as continually adding distilled water will eventually dilute the lead acid in there. And is another sign the battery should be replaced.
 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Top