2016~2020 CX-9 Brakes the same as GT-R and Sig?

Can anyone confirm if the 2016-2020 CX-9s have the same front brakes as the turbo CX-5s?

At only 18k the steering wheel vibration is to a point where I need to replace the pads and rotors on my 19 GT-r.

I’ve been using Akebono for years with great results. Their site doesn’t list an option for turbo CX-5s though. However, they do have pads for 16-20 CX-9s.

From what I can tell on mazdaparts.com, the pads are the same for the 2 models.

thanks!
 
18k is too soon for brake issues. I'd let the dealer take a look at them
I don’t disagree, but it’s a wear item and not covered. I went through this with my 16. It had a little over 20k at the time. The dealer was not willing to help. I’ve owned 3 brand new mazdas now and they’ve all had this to some level by 20k.

my guess is lack of lubrication. I’ll be cleaning and greasing everything on my wife’s new GT this month when I put on the winter wheels.

there were around 20k on the pads(akebono) and Rotors that I installed on the 16 before we traded it and everything was still great. That’s why I want Akebonos.

there’s also something to be said about doing it yourself and knowing it’s done right. I’d rather spend the 2 hours on a Saturday while I’m already in the process of swapping wheels for winter than deal with the dealer. Less stressful for me.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
I don’t disagree, but it’s a wear item and not covered. I went through this with my 16. It had a little over 20k at the time. The dealer was not willing to help. I’ve owned 3 brand new mazdas now and they’ve all had this to some level by 20k.

my guess is lack of lubrication. I’ll be cleaning and greasing everything on my wife’s new GT this month when I put on the winter wheels.

there were around 20k on the pads(akebono) and Rotors that I installed on the 16 before we traded it and everything was still great. That’s why I want Akebonos.

there’s also something to be said about doing it yourself and knowing it’s done right. I’d rather spend the 2 hours on a Saturday while I’m already in the process of swapping wheels for winter than deal with the dealer. Less stressful for me.
Usually dealers will fix any brake problems in the first year but it depends the problems you have. My rear pads、rotors、and calipers were all replaced under warranty right before my 3-year / 36,000-mile new-car warranty expired. Your front disk brakes definitely are having problems so that you need a new set at 18K miles. I’d try to get them covered under warranty, and escalate the case to Mazda North American Operations if necessary.

And yes, CX-5 2.5T has the same front brake pads、rotors、and dual-piston calipers as those on gen-2 CX-9.

Brake Pads - Mazda (TKY8-33-28ZA)

Rotor - Mazda (TK78-33-251B)
 
Last edited:
Usually dealers will fix any brake problems in the first year but it depends the problems you have. My rear pads、rotors、and calipers were all replaced under warranty right before my 3-year / 36,000-mile new-car warranty expired. Your front disk brakes definitely are having problems so that you need a new set at 18K miles. I’d try to get them covered under warranty, and escalate the case to Mazda North American Operations if necessary.

And yes, CX-5 2.5T has the same front brake pads、rotors、and dual-piston calipers as those on gen-2 CX-9.

Brake Pads - Mazda (TKY8-33-28ZA)

Rotor - Mazda (TK78-33-251B)
Thanks, I appreciate the confirmation on the part numbers.

As I mentioned in my earlier post, it’s just not worth it for me to bother with the dealership. I’d rather pay the $175 on parts and spend the 2 hours instead of disagreeing with a service writer who doesn’t know what they’re talking about. I totally understand that’s not how everyone would look at it.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Thanks, I appreciate the confirmation on the part numbers.

As I mentioned in my earlier post, it’s just not worth it for me to bother with the dealership. I’d rather pay the $175 on parts and spend the 2 hours instead of disagreeing with a service writer who doesn’t know what they’re talking about. I totally understand that’s not how everyone would look at it.
I guess if you can DIY on front brakes and enjoy doing it that’d be great. People suggesting you to go through the dealership is because something else other than disk rotors and pads could be wrong on your front brakes when you need new rotors and pads at only 18K miles. In my case both rear disk calipers were at fault which is an expensive repair. Hopefully it’s just the bad rotors but you definitely want to check if there’s enough lubrication on caliper pins suggested by others.
 
I guess if you can DIY on front brakes and enjoy doing it that’d be great. People suggesting you to go through the dealership is because something else other than disk rotors and pads could be wrong on your front brakes when you need new rotors and pads at only 18K miles. In my case both rear disk calipers were at fault which is an expensive repair. Hopefully it’s just the bad rotors but you definitely want to check if there’s enough lubrication on caliper pins suggested by others.
Per my original post, this has been a common issue with every new Mazda I’ve owned. Perhaps it’s because I often drive on mountain access roads in the winter. But again, the issue never returns after I replace the pads and rotors. Another reason for the preference to do my own brake work. No need to hope the dealership does it right.

There are no issues with my calipers other than the likely lack of lube (think of all the reports of low fluids from the factory) like I said in my original post. Or less than premium parts being used. Both could cause the uneven pad material distribution on the rotor. If they were malfunctioning entirely it would be obvious. I’ve checked rotor temps multiple times and it’s always normal.

I’m pretty sure your issue was related to a TSB for the EPB. There are no TSBs that I could find on these calipers.

You are quite quick to say there is a bigger issue and that one should fight with a dealer or Mazda corporate. That’s a huge waste of time for something as simple as changing pads and rotors(I know, not so simple for everyone). As always, I appreciate your input though.
 
:
2014 & 2019 CX-5 Touring(s)
This sounds like simple brake pad material build-up on the rotors. It may be that the Mazda pads are more subject to this, but it could also be your driving style that is exacerbating it. If you often brake hard (i.e. coming down a mountain) and then stop with your foot on the brake, the hot rotors/pads can weld a slight amount of the pad material to the rotors, causing an irregular surface.

One solution is to perform the classic 'bedding new pads' procedure. On a straight deserted road, accelerate to 60mph and brake hard as you can (without triggering the ABS) down to 15-20 mph and release the brakes. Repeat this 4-5 times (turning around if necessary) and drive home, letting the brakes cool before you park. This will heat-scrub the rotors, removing the trace amounts of pad material.

Try that first before you go to the effort and expense of new pads/rotors.
 
This sounds like simple brake pad material build-up on the rotors. It may be that the Mazda pads are more subject to this, but it could also be your driving style that is exacerbating it. If you often brake hard (i.e. coming down a mountain) and then stop with your foot on the brake, the hot rotors/pads can weld a slight amount of the pad material to the rotors, causing an irregular surface.

One solution is to perform the classic 'bedding new pads' procedure. On a straight deserted road, accelerate to 60mph and brake hard as you can (without triggering the ABS) down to 15-20 mph and release the brakes. Repeat this 4-5 times (turning around if necessary) and drive home, letting the brakes cool before you park. This will heat-scrub the rotors, removing the trace amounts of pad material.

Try that first before you go to the effort and expense of new pads/rotors.
It’s 100% an uneven distribution of pad material on the rotor(like 90% of the claims of “warped “rotors). I can see and feel it. They’re past being able to resolve with additional bedding. I could find a shop with a machine to turn them down while on the vehicle, but I’d rather replace everything at this point.

I never keep my foot firmly planted on the pedal when stopped and always in manual mode when descending steep grades . Not much I can change about my driving habits to prevent this.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
yes its a possibility.
btw does somebody know what is the correct torque?
You’ll get a range value, 80 ~ 108 ft·lb, as usual, a Mazda special.
Lug nut tightening torque

When installing a tire, tighten the lug nut to the following torque.
108―147 N·m (12―14 kgf·m, 80―108 ft·lbf)
 
well the only option then if you are willing to do on your own (skipping the dealer and possible warranty claim on brakes) I guess would be to shell some $$ and get a decent brand disc and pads and see if this helps going forward.
the mazda oem are nothing special anyway.

p.s. I have had good experience with brembo, ebc and there was another brand wich is used oem on most german luxury cars but cant recall the name.
brembos dust like crazy though but were great in stopping from high speeds.
 
Last edited:
:
CX5 GT-R
Thanks but that’s not the issue. I’m the only one who has swapped wheels. I use a torque wrench. Over torquing causing these issues is more from the days when the hub and rotor were one piece.
I've had it on my 370z, my Jeep, and both cx5s. The 370z was the worst and most involved. If you can watch the rotor squirm on the lathe...it ain't pad deposits.
 
Thanks, I appreciate the confirmation on the part numbers.

As I mentioned in my earlier post, it’s just not worth it for me to bother with the dealership. I’d rather pay the $175 on parts and spend the 2 hours instead of disagreeing with a service writer who doesn’t know what they’re talking about. I totally understand that’s not how everyone would look at it.
What are the Akebono part numbers?
 
Top